Dec 12, 2019  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020

Course Descriptions


 

Art

  
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    ART 102 - Drawing I

    Credits: 4
    An observational drawing course, employing a variety of drawing materials, methods. Foundational drawing skills developed through study and effective use of line, value, mass, composition and spatial organization. Emphasis is placed on disciplined and authentic visual engagement within the created environment. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Occasionally a section may be limited to majors/minors.
  
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    ART 115 - Principles and Practicum

    Credits: 2
    Establishes common concepts of composition, design and color, the elements and principles of art, and conceptual approaches to reading and understanding artworks as texts. Regular readings and responses will set the stage for art students to approach the major with a common base of knowledge, language and understanding. Exercises on composition and color theory will constitute the bulk of the studio elements of the course. Lab Fee

    Prerequisite(s): Art major or art minor.
  
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    ART 116 - Sketchbook Process and Practice

    Credits: 2
    Exploration of the habits and best practices of drawing/engaging/seeing using the traditional artists’ tool, the sketchbook. Primarily observation based, with elements of conceptual development and collage. Lab fee.

  
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    ART 150 - Art History: Cave Art to Medieval

    Credits: 4
    Surveys development of art from cave painting through early Renaissance. Includes Western painting, sculpture and architecture as well as parallel non-Western developments.

  
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    ART 151 - Art History: Renaissance to Modern

    Credits: 4
    Continues overview of developments in Western painting, sculpture, architecture and craft from Early Renaissance to 20th century as well as parallel non-Western developments.

  
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    ART 152 - American Art History as Cultural Encounter

    Credits: 4
    Investigates conversation between many cultures and styles that have taken American art from its emergence in the Americas about five thousand years ago, to its position in the European art world during colonial and post-colonial times, to final recognition of America as a modern global art leader. (Offered online, Summer term only.)

  
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    ART 202 - Life Drawing

    Credits: 4
    Drawing from human figure; studies in anatomy; continuous use of live model; daily exercises and long-range projects. Model fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Major, ART 102  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 205 - Spatial Dynamics: 101 Materials

    Credits: 4
    This course is a studio-based three-dimensional exploration into physical, spatial, and temporal work employing a wide a range of materials and processes including paper, glass, textiles, metal, plastics, and various repurposed objects. The one constant at the core of these studies will be the invention of multiple constructed sculptural forms while concentrating on connections, dynamic movement, and site specificity. Lab fee.

  
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    ART 210 - Introduction to Painting

    Credits: 4
    Introduces oil painting methods and materials. Projects include still life, self-portrait, compositional studies. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Occasionally a section may be limited to majors/minors.
  
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    ART 215 - Introduction to Printmaking

    Credits: 4
    Explores printmaking media; brief lectures/demonstrations and guidance on individual projects. Techniques include linoleum prints, woodcuts, monotypes, drypoint and engraving. Students explore process of developing individual thematic approach. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 102  or ART 110 , major or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 220 - Photography I: Darkroom

    Credits: 4
    Introduces photographic fundamentals including camera types, function, black and white film processing and printing, natural and artificial lighting, composition, and use of photography as medium of communication and artistic expression. Basic history of film-based photography explored, introducing significant discoveries, photographers and movements. Lab fee.

  
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    ART 225 - Clay Sculpture

    Credits: 4
    Hands-on course to develop skills in three-dimensional thinking and gain working knowledge of sculptural properties of clay. Both additive and subtractive processes of construction used. Conceptual focus on mass, volume, concavity, convexity and overall interaction of form in space, along with proportion, detail and surface texture. Works completed using a combination of various methods including firing, painting and glazing. Lab fee.

  
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    ART 270 - Design Studio

    Credits: 4
    Exploration of the elements of design from the holistic idea down to small details. Design as a process will be discussed and used as a lens through which we see and interact, as a specific skill set and as a solution to visual problem solving. Students will work on design projects such as creating visual identity, employing typography and exploring the relationship between typographic elements and image. Throughout the semester we will spend time engaging with the work of professional designers, ask the question, “why are we designers?” and discuss the ethics surrounding graphic design as a marketable medium. Primary work will be in Illustrator. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 102  ART 110  
  
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    ART 310 - Figure Painting

    Credits: 4
    Perceptually based course with emphasis on human form. Building on principles from Painting I, class focuses on color and directed light to create space and form using live model, both nude and clothed. Model fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Major, ART 210  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 315 - Intaglio Printmaking

    Credits: 4
    Introduces range of intaglio techniques including hard and soft ground etching, drypoint and aquatint. Students explore process of developing individual thematic approach. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 102  or ART 110 , major or permission of instructor. ART 215  not a prerequisite.
  
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    ART 320 - Photography II: Digital

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to digital photography, equipment and processes. Adobe Lightroom introduced and utilized as primary processing application throughout course. Examines image presentation possibilities from screen to print. Continues exploration of photography as communicative and expressive tool. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Major or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 325 - Stone Sculpture: Carving

    Credits: 4
    Introduces methods of carving stone “in the round” and in relief. Subtractive methods of carving employed while incorporating elements of sculptural form, including mass/space relationships, volume, surface planes, transitional forms and textural variety. Students use traditional and power tools with varieties of alabaster and limestone. Representational and nonrepresentational imagery from both Western and non-Western traditions encouraged. Lab fee.

  
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    ART 345 - Liturgy and Image: Art for Worship

    Credits: 4
    Explores unique function of liturgical art, examining ways art has been used in the church in the past and considering contemporary examples. Students work collaboratively with local church congregation or with A. J. Gordon Memorial Chapel to create art for use in worship that expresses the life of the community. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 102  or ART 110 , major or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 350 - Anatomy for the Artist

    Credits: 4
    Intensive study of structure and proportion of human figure, skeletal and muscular systems and their operation, to better equip students for figurative works; memorization and drawing of each part and its relationship to the figure as a whole. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Major, ART 102  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 367 - Illustration

    Credits: 4
    Illustration is visual art created in dialog with the written word. Students work with self-selected texts and create imagery using variety of media (gold-leaf, printmaking and painting techniques) and approaches (abstraction, collage, figurative imagery). Projects may also include service projects for the community. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 202 .
  
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    ART 370 - Selected Topics: Design Studio

    Credits: 2
    Through a rotating selection of 2 credit class, students will broaden their experience in Design. Students will choose classes that best fit their unique interest in Design and allow them to expand their skill set. Each class will be geared around a particular area in Design. All of these courses will build off of the foundation of Design Studio-design grounded in observation, engagement and creative problem solving. Repeatable for free elective credit. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 270  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 4
    Examines areas of visual art not regularly taught. Emphasizes developing advanced studio disciplines and preparing individualized portfolio. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic is different. Lab fee when appropriate.

  
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    ART 381 - Independent Study

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Independent semester-long course in topic not available in existing curriculum; provides curricular enrichment.
    Limited availability subject to faculty workload. May require lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative average of 2.75, adequate background to support topic, permission of instructor, advisor, department chair and registrar.
     
  
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    ART 400 - Thesis II: Exhibit

    Credits: 4
    Senior art majors develop a body of work and a personal artistic direction culminating in a gallery exhibit their final semester. Each senior chooses the media and conceptual thematic center of this work while meeting weekly with a faculty mentor and fellow senior artists.  

      Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior art major, ART 402 or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 401 - Experimental Drawing: Abstraction

    Credits: 4
    Advanced-level drawing class extending beyond traditional boundaries to explore two-dimensional surface through use of metaphoric visual language. Variety of papers, pigments, drawing tools (traditional and contemporary) and adhesives used. Larger scale works encouraged. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

  
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    ART 402 - Thesis I: Art and Vocation

    Credits: 4
    Junior or senior art majors explore theoretical components of vocation and the practical needs of entering the job market (résumé writing, networking, resources, occupational options). Weekly guest artists and designers share their work and career path, while interacting with each member of the class. This class also prepares juniors and seniors for their spring senior thesis through regular intervals of individual studio work and critiques.   

      Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior art major or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 410 - Modern Art Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Introduces major trends, theories and movements in 20th-century art (Cubism, Surrealism, Expressionism, Minimalism, etc.); Modernism and Postmodernism discussed within Western contexts while addressing non-Western influences. Open to nonmajors.

  
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    ART 425 - Art Internship

    Credits: 4
    Combines academic study and on-the-job work experience. Must be prearranged and approved by instructor and registrar, and by department chair for Design Studio Concentration.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA.
  
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    ART 430 - Advanced Painting

    Credits: 4
    For upper-level art majors with concentration in painting. Explores and extends personal visual language and promotes greater sophistication of painting technique and theory. May be taken in conjunction with ART 400 - Thesis II: Exhibit . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 210 , ART 310  and/or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 435 - Figurative Sculpture

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on working directly from model in clay with intent to cast a work within the semester. Procedures dealing with proportion, making molds (rubber molds, waste molds) and expression covered. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 225  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 440 - Painting: The Figure in Context

    Credits: 4
    Pre-thesis studio painting course exploring use of human figure in narrative, social commentary, religious iconography and other contexts. Model fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, or junior standing with permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 445 - Advanced Sculpture: Wood and Marble

    Credits: 4
    Greater sophistication of sculptural thinking and scale incorporated with advanced carving methods and tools. Both traditional tools and power tools such as pneumatic hammers, die grinders and chainsaws employed with emphasis on craftsmanship and safety. Works carved in varieties of wood and marble while exploring wide range of imagery and conceptual approaches. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Major, ART 225  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 470 - Typography

    Credits: 4
    Students will learn the basic principles of typography including the study of letter forms, type classification, legibility, layering, sequencing, organization and hierarchy, as well as text applications and layouts. Typography will be explored as both a means of communication and a visual expression. Computer based primarily in InDesign and some Photoshop.   (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): ART 270 , major or permission of instructor.

American Studies Program

  
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    ASP 201 - Professional Development Practicum

    Credits: 1
    Matches student with experienced professional engaged in vocational service relevant to student’s own vocational aspirations. Monthly group meetings.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester American Studies Program.
  
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    ASP 324 - The Politics of Public Policy

    Credits: 3
    In this course, students directly engage Washington, D.C.-based policy experts and organizations-governmental and non-governmental, national and international-to deepen their understanding of the roles and influence of various political actors and institutions during the formulation stage of policymaking. The course first introduces students to models of policymaking and the tools of policy analysis. Next, students will learn to apply these concepts to the study of both a foreign and domestic policy issue through desk and field research. By studying foreign and domestic policy simultaneously, students will be able to identify and explain the differences between them in political environment, policy participants and public discourse. The course emphasizes written and oral communication through the development of professional memo-writing and presentation skills.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester American Studies Program.
  
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    ASP 330 - Case Studies in Strategic Communication

    Credits: 3
    Students produce a portfolio comprising group and individual case-study findings, informational interviews, communications materials, and ethical reflections on strategic communication practices. The all-track case study investigates the role strategic communication-coordinating and measuring the impact of advertising, direct response, fundraising and development, marketing, and public relations-plays in achieving organizational goals. Direct engagement with Washington, D.C. organizations and communication professionals helps students learn from experience how to differentiate between the practices of strategic, tactical, operational, and contingency plans. Each student produces a case study tied to his or her internship or another national or international organization. A concluding conference allows students to share and compare research findings across institutional types and sizes.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester American Studies Program.
  
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    ASP 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 1 - 3
    Topic not regularly offered.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester American Studies Program
  
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    ASP 425 - American Studies Internship

    Credits: 8-9
    Integration of faith with practice in volunteer work experience in Washington, D.C., in a professional setting in student’s major field of concentration. Minimum of 20 hours a week; three reflective essays and summary paper. Supervised by American Studies Program staff.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester American Studies Program.

Australia Studies Centre

  
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    ASC 200 - The View from Australia

    Credits: 4
    The emphasis of this unit is on current issues and world developments that affect Australia, as interpreted from an Australian perspective. Through examination of Australians’ reactions to and handling of these matters, students should develop a basic understanding of the Australian culture and worldview and should be able to articulate, appreciate and critique the orienting values of Australian society. Students will also compare, contrast and critique their own cultural value structures through reflection exercises and begin to distinguish cultural virtues from Christian truth. Themes for the unit include: the settlement of Australia and the influence of landscape and environment on national identity; Australian government; Australian ideological trends, religion, immigration, consumer behavior and foreign policy. This unit includes a 35-hour service placement.

    Corequisite(s): Only available to students participating in the BestSemester Australia Studies Centre program.
  
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    ASC 201 - Australian Indigenous Worldviews

    Credits: 4
    A person who holds a Bible-based Christ-centered worldview endeavors to be thorough in the application of that worldview to all of life. This unit will introduce some of the ways that Aboriginal peoples view the world around them, and will provide insights into Aboriginal spirituality. The intersection of Aboriginal thought and the revelation of God in Christ found in Scripture will be examined to bring greater understanding of Aboriginal worldviews. This unit will also examine some of the core elements of Aboriginal worldviews in order to develop meaningful dialogue that may lead to the transformation of the Australian national life story.  As part of this unit students will engage in two “in-country” experiences with Aboriginal communities.

    Prerequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Australia Studies Centre program.
  
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    ASC 202 - Indigenous Cultures in Australia & Aotearoa (New Zealand)

    Credits: 4


    This unit requires a 6 day trip to Aotearoa/New Zealand after the regular ASC semester and incurs an additional unit fee. (Minimum enrollment: 10 students)

    This unit emphasizes the histories of Indigenous people of Australia and New Zealand. Aboriginal people living in Australia today are the present “face” of ancient cultural lines that stretch back over eons of time. These lines contain knowledge about connections to Country; family relationships and kinship systems; an education system that is ‘holistic’; teaching about the physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual levels of an individual; practical knowledge for daily survival; the Ancestral Spirits and Creation stories; ceremonies, songs, dances and music. The Māori people are a vibrant influence in the cultural makeup of Aotearoa/New Zealand. Many of the exceptional qualities of this nation come from the interactions between Māori and non-Māori (or Pākehā). This unit will begin by looking at the various lines that cover the following: Aboriginal and Māori concepts of Country, spiritual belief systems, kinship and family relationships, totemic systems, foods and medicines, education systems and spiritual beliefs, including the Creation stories. Other lines will include the arrival of Europeans; the disruption to Indigenous ways of life; Aboriginal & Māori resistance; racism and its consequences, the church’s involvement; government policies, including the removal of Aboriginal children from their families; land rights; Māori rituals (or tikanga), and Indigenous identity in the 21st century.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Australia Studies Centre program.


Biblical Studies and Christian Ministries

  
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    BCM 100 - Introduction to Theological Reflection

    Credits: 2
    An introduction to theological reflection for those participants in Summit, Gordon’s program for incoming freshmen. Building on a broad theological framework (creation, fall, redemption, and consummation), this course offers students the opportunity to develop the skill of reflecting theologically in matters of faith and life in the intensive, intentional community that is Summit.

    Prerequisite(s): Participant in Summit program.
  
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    BCM 101 - Old Testament History, Literature and Theology

    Credits: 4
    Examines Old Testament history and teaching against cultural, geographical and literary background of Ancient Near East. Archaeology, comparative history and literature; key theological themes foundational to New Testament and Western culture.

    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    BCM 103 - New Testament History, Literature and Theology

    Credits: 4
    Examines history and teachings of New Testament in political, social and religious contexts. Highlights important theological themes such as sin, grace, justification by faith, Kingdom of God.

    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    BCM 104 - Ecclesiology: The Church and Its Ministries

    Credits: 4
    Explores the question, “What is the church?” and introduces historic and contemporary responses found among the Christian traditions (e.g. Orthodox, Roman Catholic, Reformed, Free Churches, Pentecostal).  Introduces the Church’s purpose and ministries (worship, edification, and proclamation in word and deed) as essentially related to God’s past, present, and future redemptive movement.  Examines contemporary challenges and opportunities for the Global Church (e.g. unity and diversity, virtual-mediated community, rise of the church in the Global South) by introducing practical theology research.

  
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    BCM 105 - Foundations of Youth Ministry

    Credits: 4
    Examines purpose of youth ministry, youth in modern American culture, needs of youth and their parents, history and future of youth ministry profession, and elements of programming.

  
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    BCM 201 - Greek I

    Credits: 4
    Introduces fundamentals of Greek of New Testament era. Emphasizes grammar and reading skills.

    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    BCM 202 - Greek II

    Credits: 4
    Continues Greek I; extensive reading in Johannine literature of Greek New Testament.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 201  (with a C or better) or equivalent.
    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    BCM 203 - Gospel of Matthew

    Credits: 4
    Examines in detail the first Gospel in light of its literary and historical-cultural milieu. Attention given to the book’s theological distinctives and reception history.

    Prerequisite(s):  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 204 - Luke/Acts

    Credits: 4
    Studies Christian origins according to Gospel of Luke and Acts of the Apostles. Examines literary features, socio-cultural context and theological themes in narratives. Also comparative analysis of continuity and discontinuity in ministries of Jesus Christ of Nazareth and that of Paul of Tarsus. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 205 - Corinthian Correspondence

    Credits: 4
    Surveys Paul’s correspondence with the Corinthian church, problems arising in the clash of Christian faith with pagan culture, and relevance for today’s church. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s):  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 209 - Romans and Galatians

    Credits: 4
    Studies two of Paul’s most important letters and basic Christian teachings against background of current thought concerning problems of sin, guilt, faith and religious experience.

    Prerequisite(s):  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 210 - Prison Epistles

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on historical background, structure, theology and message of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and Philemon. Attention also given to issues of authority, literary genre, development of Pauline thought and contemporary relevance of documents studied. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s):  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 211 - Pentateuch

    Credits: 4
    Examines in detail history, culture and law of early Israel and role each played in development of Judaism and Christianity. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  
  
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    BCM 215 - Foundations for Global Christianity

    Credits: 4
    Comprehensive introduction to world Christian movement as involved in mission. Course provides systematic and critical understanding based on biblical foundations, historical developments, cultural issues and strategic approaches. Analysis of dynamics of growth of Christian movement from Apostolic era to present day.

  
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    BCM 216 - Contemporary Developments in World Missions

    Credits: 4
    Analysis of recent developments and debates in mission circles. Addresses issues pertaining to traditional missionary service and tentmaking through teaching, government service, international business and healthcare. Special attention given to major leaders in evangelization of new peoples and nations and to diverse structures of mission outreach. Topics include contextualization, demographic shifts, cross-cultural family life, healthcare overseas, relationship between justice and evangelization, and liberation theology.

  
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    BCM 220 - Introduction to Biblical Studies

    Credits: 4
    Introduces academic study of Bible and related topics; addresses historical and geographical backgrounds, literary and socio-anthropological approaches to text, selected theological issues and research methods.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  BCM 103 
  
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    BCM 225 - Preparation for World Missions

    Credits: 2
    Designed to be taken spring prior to students embarking on summer missions trips. Prepares students for cross-cultural summer missions experiences focusing on cultural analysis and sensitivity, and cross-cultural living.

  
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    BCM 227 - Prophetic Literature

    Credits: 4
    Studies history and exegesis of selected writings from prophets of ancient Israel. Views New Testament revelation in relation to and applied to modern thought and contemporary literature. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  
  
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    BCM 232 - Biblical Archaeology

    Credits: 4
    Studies archaeological discoveries and documents which shed light on the Bible and its world. Emphasizes Dead Sea Scrolls. Field trips to museums. (Alternate years.)

  
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    BCM 234 - Modern Jewish Culture

    Credits: 4
    Studies emergence of contemporary Judaism in comparison with biblical Judaism. Traditions in life of a Jew from birth to death. History of Christian-Jewish relations. Numerous field trips and discussions with rabbis. Not open to freshmen.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  
  
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    BCM 241 - Family and Adolescent Counseling

    Credits: 4
    Examines needs and problems of normal and troubled adolescent experience. Attention given to developing strategy of ministry through counseling.

  
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    BCM 243 - Justice and Mercy: Theological Anthropology

    Credits: 4
    What does it mean to be human? Theological anthropology explores this question by emphasizing the transformative nature of our relationship to God and our participation in the cultures and societies in which we develop our identities. This course offers students the opportunity for theological reflection on the doctrines of creation, Christology, soteriology, and eschatology in dialogue with current issues of global justice so that we might be agents of God’s mercy toward our fellow human beings. (Alternate years.)

  
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    BCM 245 - Ancient/Medieval Theology

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the theological developments from the second through the fourteenth centuries.  This course will explore the central discussions and developments in patristic theology (the ecumenical creeds, the Biblical canon, the doctrines of the Trinity and Christology) and of medieval theology (the relationship between reason and revelation, atonement, and mysticism).  

  
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    BCM 246 - Renewals and Reformations

    Credits: 4
    An examination of the theological developments from the Reformation to the present.  This course will explore the central discussions of the Protestant Reformation (nature and grace, sacraments, the doctrine of Scripture) and developments in theology from the Enlightenment to the present, including predominant movements in contemporary and global theology.

  
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    BCM 253 - Leadership Theories and Practice

    Credits: 4
    Surveys variety of philosophies, styles, issues and current challenges for developing leadership in youth ministry. Students challenged to grow as leaders and develop personal philosophy of Christian leadership. Spring semester offering for Christian Ministries majors/minors only.

  
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    BCM 260 - Christian Formation in Cultural Contexts

    Credits: 4
    Examines dynamics of Christian formation in adolescence within sociocultural environments of ancient and contemporary worlds. Emphasizes interrelated and distinct stages of faith formation, theological interplay between Christ and culture, and ways culture influences our understanding of God, ourselves and the Church. Fall semester offering for Christian Ministries majors/minors only.

  
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    BCM 270 - Worship: Theology and Practice

    Credits: 2
    Introduction to theological foundations, history and practice of Christian worship, with special reference to basic forms and practices. Designed to help students develop biblical and practical framework for understanding worship. (Offered alternate spring semesters.)

  
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    BCM 271 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2-4
    Topics not regularly taught but of interest to majors. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. (Offered periodically.)

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor as applicable.
  
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    BCM 275 - Leadership for Short-Term Missions

    Credits: 2
    Provides overview of leadership principles, philosophy and practice related to short-term missions. Explores biblical theologies of missions, anthropological implications, and various legal and ethical issues related to short-term missions.

  
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    BCM 277 - Future of Youth Ministries

    Credits: 2
    Focuses on broadest possible understanding of youth ministries across cultures and traditions. Students engage in analysis and critique of variety of emerging movements in youth ministries. Course fee and participation at one of national youth ministry conventions required. (Offered alternate fall semesters.)

  
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    BCM 291 - International Seminar: Historical and Geographical Settings of the Bible

    Credits: 4
    Intensive three-week academic field study designed to introduce geography, history and archaeology of Israel. Regional studies, on-site lectures, preparatory lectures on campus and required map work prior to arrival help students apply geographical context of the land to biblical studies. (Summers.)

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  BCM 103 
  
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    BCM 302 - Old Testament Theology

    Credits: 4
    Jewish roots of Christian faith as developed throughout Old Testament Scriptures. Emphasizes humanity, covenant, Kingdom of God, Messianic teaching, sin, salvation, worship and Old Testament authority. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 303 - Greek III

    Credits: 4
    Requires translation of New Testament Greek materials; emphasizes vocabulary building and mastery of grammar.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 202  or equivalent.
  
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    BCM 304 - Seminar in Greek Exegesis: Gospel of Mark

    Credits: 4
    Introduces students to techniques of Greek exegesis through analysis of the Gospel of Mark. Exegesis papers written and discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 303  or equivalent; BCM 101  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 308 - Christian Theology

    Credits: 4
    Introduces key ideas, traditions and people who have shaped the development of Christian theology from antiquity to the present. Considers importance of theology as foundation for Christian thought, as guide to the Church, and as a primary resource for living reflective lives and engaging broader world with the gospel.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101 , BCM 103 .
    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    BCM 311 - Hebrew I

    Credits: 4
    Introduces fundamentals of biblical Hebrew; emphasizes grammar, vocabulary and syntax. (Alternate years.)

    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    BCM 312 - Hebrew II

    Credits: 4
    Continues Hebrew I; readings and exegesis of selected prose and poetic portions of Hebrew Bible. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 311 .
    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    BCM 313 - History of Israel

    Credits: 4
    Studies geographical, economic, social, political, cultural and religious changes in ancient Israel from patriarchs to intertestamental period. Includes focus on land of the Bible stressing relevant biblical, historical and archaeological materials that inform our understanding of biblical Israel. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s):  BCM 101  
  
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    BCM 314 - Survey of World Religions

    Credits: 4
    Surveys major non-Christian religions of world. Focuses on history, belief structure and relationship to culture; key issues in presenting gospel message to adherents of each religion.

  
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    BCM 315 - Educational Theories and Methods

    Credits: 4
    Investigates historical and contemporary philosophies of education, educational theory, components of curriculum theory; evaluates and critiques published curricular materials, and designs teaching-learning experiences appropriate for Christian ministries.

  
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    BCM 317 - Gospel of John

    Credits: 4
    Studies Gospel of John from number of perspectives, emphasizing literary analysis, historical and exegetical issues as well as theological distinctives. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s):  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 318 - Gender in the Church: Biblical and Theological Perspectives

    Credits: 4
    Emphasizes critical study of Scripture that moves beyond experiential arguments concerning gender issues through historic overview, examining relevant Scripture passages alongside interpretations from various perspectives, outlining possibilities for feminist theology, and exploring contemporary gender issues in Church.

  
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    BCM 320 - Expository Communication

    Credits: 2
    Explores communication strategy and elements of homiletical theory in effective presentation of gospel message to youth. Opportunities to design and deliver youth talks.

  
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    BCM 321 - Evangelism and Discipleship

    Credits: 4
    Analyzes spiritual decision-making process, communication theory and strategy for contemporary culture, and art of persuasion; spiritual formation and nurture. Incorporates individual experiences in personal evangelism and small-group discipleship.

  
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    BCM 322 - American Christianity

    Credits: 4
    Studies development of Christianity in America from 17th century to today; people (e.g., Edwards, Rauschenbusch) and movements (e.g., Revivalism, Social Gospel Movement, Fundamentalism) which gave it form. Field trips to Boston.

  
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    BCM 324 - Pastoral Epistles

    Credits: 4
    Studies New Testament documents known as “Pastoral Epistles,” I and II Timothy and Titus, focusing attention on background and occasion of each book, and, more importantly, structure and theology. Considers issues of authority and contemporary relevance to life of Church. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s):  BCM 103  
  
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    BCM 325 - Wisdom Literature

    Credits: 4
    Examines wisdom writings of biblical period in historical and literary contexts to find meaning and practical application to today; Job, Ecclesiastes, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, Egyptian parallels; selected intertestamental writings and New Testament illustrations. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101  
  
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    BCM 330 - Persecution to Empire:Theology, Politics, and Culture in Early Christianity

    Credits: 4
    This course explores how early Christians understood their place in redemption history and began to tell that story. As an introduction to early Christian thought at large, this class serves as a foundation for the more intricate theological discussions of the fourth century, such as Trinity and Christology. Students will gain experience reading ancient texts and learn how to navigate the age of Constantine, a period of great political, ecclesiological, and theological change.

  
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    BCM 335 - Biblical Hermeneutics

    Credits: 4
    Studies selected critical problems relating to origin, transmission and interpretation of biblical books.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 101 , BCM 103 .
  
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    BCM 350 - Trinity and Christology

    Credits: 4
    The understanding of God as Trinity and the doctrine of Christology have been the centerpieces of theological reflection in the Christian tradition from the earliest churches to the present day. In this course we will explore the biblical/theological foundations, historical development, and contemporary approaches to the doctrines of the Trinity and Christology. The course, then, is an attempt to explore how various streams in the church formulated the nature of God, the Redeemer figure, and the redeemed people.

  
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    BCM 360 - Christian Apologetics

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to Christian apologetics through critical analysis of theology pertaining to articulation of Christian faith. Challenges students to broaden understanding of what they believe and why they believe it, in order to develop personal statement of faith and verbally explain and defend faith in atmosphere of doubt.

  
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    BCM 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2-4
    Upper-level seminar course focuses on select topics not regularly taught. Designated as repeatable with a different topic.

  
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    BCM 377 - Future of the Church

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on broadest possible understanding of contemporary church. Students engage in analysis and critique of variety of emerging movements in North American and global churches. (Offered alternate fall semesters.) Course fee and participation at church leadership conference required.

  
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    BCM 410 - Readings in Theology

    Credits: 4
    Reading and research in selected areas of theology. Topics vary.

  
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    BCM 425 - Practicum in Christian Ministries I

    Credits: 2-6
    Involves 400 hours of ministry experience in church or parachurch setting under supervision of on-site minister. Placements made in summer following junior year or during senior year. Practicum students attend on-campus meetings throughout academic year or are visited by instructor on-site in summer. Repeatable for elective credit if completed in a dissimilar context.

    Prerequisite(s): Pre- and/or concurrent requisites: BCM 105 , BCM 241 , BCM 253 , BCM 260 , BCM 320  and BCM 321  or by permission of instructor.
    International placements may fulfill core Global Understanding theme.
  
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    BCM 426 - Practicum in Christian Ministries II

    Credits: 2-6
    Involves 400 hours of ministry experience in church or parachurch setting under supervision of on-site minister. Placements made in summer following junior year or during senior year. Practicum students attend on-campus meetings throughout academic year or are visited by instructor on-site in summer. Repeatable for elective credit if completed in a dissimilar context.

    Prerequisite(s): Pre- and/or concurrent requisites: BCM 105 , BCM 241 , BCM 253 , BCM 260 , BCM 320  and BCM 321  or by permission of instructor.
    International placements may fulfill core Global Understanding theme.
  
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    BCM 427 - Missions Practicum

    Credits: 0-8
    Provides students with eight-week cross-cultural experience overseas. Practicum emphasizes completion of particular missions project under direction of field missionary or missions agency. Must be prearranged and approved by instructor. Fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 215 , BCM 216 , BCM 225  and BCM 314 .
  
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    BCM 428 - Jewish Studies Concentration Internship

    Credits: 2
    Provides students opportunity to serve within Jewish community, gaining firsthand experience on community projects and learning about Jews and Judaism with purpose of further fostering positive relationships between Jewish and Christian communities.

    Prerequisite(s): Advance approval by supervising faculty member and registrar, and minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.
  
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    BCM 429 - Internship

    Credits: 1-4
    Combines on-the-job work experience with related academic study. Must be prearranged and approved by the chair of the biblical studies department and the Registrar’s Office. Maximum of one internship. Does not replace required practicums within the department.

    Prerequisite(s): Biblical Studies majors only; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.
 

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