Apr 10, 2020  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020

Course Descriptions


 

Biblical Studies and Christian Ministries

  
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    BCM 471 - Research I

    Credits: 1-4
    Research projects under the supervision of faculty member for upperclass students. Often the initial research for an honors thesis.

    Prerequisite(s): Upperclass standing and permission of supervising faculty member.
  
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    BCM 472 - Research II

    Credits: 4
    Individual research for departmental honors thesis.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of supervising faculty member.
  
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    BCM 491 - Senior Seminar in Christian Ministries

    Credits: 4
    Reading and research in selected area of ministry. Integrative experience brings to culmination various facets of ministry.

    Prerequisite(s): BCM 104 BCM 260 , BCM 321 , senior standing, major or minor
  
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    BCM 492 - Senior Seminar in Biblical Studies

    Credits: 4
    Reading and research in selected areas of biblical studies. Topics vary.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing

Biology

  
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    BIO 100 - First Year Seminar

    Credits: 1
    Students will explore the spectrum of subjects relevant to first-year entering students in the biological sciences, including establishing community, developing effective study habits, and exploring the breadth of study available in biology at Gordon College.  First-semester biology students only. Offered fall semester, 1st quad.

    Prerequisite(s): First-semester biology student.
  
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    BIO 105 - Cell Structure and Function

    Credits: 2
    Concepts of cell structure and function. Cellular processes including respiration and photosynthesis, mitosis and meiosis. Weekly laboratory. Offered every fall. Lab fee.

  
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    BIO 106 - Genetics and Development

    Credits: 2
    Explores Mendelian, molecular and developmental genetics. Weekly laboratory. Offered every fall. Lab fee.

  
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    BIO 107 - Organismal Form and Function

    Credits: 2
    Explores animal and plant anatomy and physiology with emphasis on application in human systems. Weekly laboratory. Offered every spring. Lab fees.

  
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    BIO 108 - Ecology and Evolution

    Credits: 2
    Features ecological systems and key concepts of evolutionary theory. Weekly laboratory. Offered every spring Lab fee.

  
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    BIO 171 - Selected Topics

    Credits: Variable
    Explores topic not regularly offered. Designated as repeatable for credit; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. Offered as needed. Fees as needed.

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor.
  
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    BIO 205 - Introduction to the Discipline of Biochemistry

    Credits: 2
    This course builds on the first-year curriculum by allowing students to explore potential career paths within the discipline of biochemistry. The content of this course serves as a bridge between the first-year curriculum and more advanced courses in biochemistry. Students will be introduced to some of the main themes of biochemistry from the perspective of examining applications of those techniques. Students will be exposed to some of the current medical and industrial applications of biochemical research through field trips and by reading primary literature. Students will learn about key discoveries in biochemistry leading to major breakthroughs in the field. Students will also explore ethical issues regarding some of the applications of biochemistry. Cross-listed as CHE 205  

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 ,  CHE 111 CHE 112  
  
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    BIO 213 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    Credits: 4
    Examines structure and function of human body. Emphasizes organ systems: skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Weekly laboratory. Cross-listed as KIN 213 . Lab fee.

  
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    BIO 214 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    Credits: 4
    Examines structure and function of human body. Emphasizes organ systems: skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Weekly laboratory. Cross-listed as KIN 214 . Lab fee.

  
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    BIO 222 - Environmental Science

    Credits: 4
    In-depth study of environment and human interaction with it. Major topics include the science of ecosystems, ecosystem functioning, human effects on the world, stewardship ethics and sustainability. (Offered every semester)

  
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    BIO 225 - Nutrition

    Credits: 4
    Explores fundamentals of current nutritional science; emphasizes physiological basis. Analyzes proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and their major functions, and importance of water. Encompasses whole person and integral role of nutrition in human health. (Alternate years. Offered spring of even years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106  .
  
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    BIO 230 - Introduction to Marine Science

    Credits: 4
    Explores marine systems. Includes in-depth study of geological, chemical, physical and biological oceanography. Emphasizes field experience. (Offered fall semester.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106  .
  
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    BIO 250 - Biology III: Plants, Ecology and Evolution

    Credits: 4
    Introduces complex issues of evolution and ecology, focusing on plant biology. Discusses different ways Christians have addressed controversial issues in biology. Offered fall semester. Lab fee.

  
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    BIO 255 - Biological Sciences and Faith

    Credits: 2
    Explores topics of the Christian faith as they relate to biology and biochemistry, including origins, ethics, age of the earth, and biotechnology. 

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIO 260 - Introduction to Research in Biology

    Credits: 2
    Emphasizes skills necessary to become working scientist and sets stage for upper-level biology courses. Meets once per week. (Offered fall and spring each year.)

  
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    BIO 302 - Crops and Society

    Credits: 4
    Studies major food crops in world agriculture: adaptation, production, utilization, morphology and reproduction. Focus on social, economic, political, cultural and environmental issues pertaining to past and modern agricultural practices. (Offered spring semester.)

  
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    BIO 304 - Conservation Biology

    Credits: 4
    Ecological, population and genetic factors that influence biological diversity presented from biological, social and faith-based perspectives. Topics include theoretical concepts and practical applications to preserve and protect ecosystems, habitats and species in decline with emphasis on sustainability and stewardship. (Alternate years. Offered fall of odd years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 222  or BIO 108 .
  
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    BIO 305 - Medical Biotechnology

    Credits: 4
    Explores the range of applications for biotechnology in the medical sciences: as a diagnostic tool, as well as for the treatment of disease and prevention of disease. Students will learn about the history of medical biotechnology by reading some key scientific journal articles. The course will also cover major recent advances in this field. Students will explore ethical issues regarding the use of available biotechnology. Lab fee

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  and BIO 106  . Recommended: BIO 314 BIO 316 BIO 321 BIO 333 BIO 341  
  
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    BIO 307 - Controversial Issues in Environmental Science

    Credits: 2
    Explores controversial issues in environmental science that are relevant politically, socially, and scientifically. Topics range from major conceptual ideas (nature valuation, reintroduction of extinct species) to merits of specific possible approaches (banning plastic bags to protect the environment) through class discussion from multiple perspectives.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 222 - Environmental Science  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIO 308 - Botany

    Credits: 4
    Surveys plant diversity of vascular and nonvascular plants. Studies vascular plants of New England in natural habitats through field trips and in laboratory. Visits to botanical gardens, local farm and greenhouses. Weekly laboratory. (Offered fall semester.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108  .
  
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    BIO 309 - Medicinal Botany

    Credits: 4
    This is primarily a plant biology course that covers medicinal plants. This course provides students the opportunity to survey the diversity of medicinal plants and study the history and uses of plants for medicine and other purposes. Students will learn about the medicinal properties of plants and their role in both traditional and modern medicine; gain insights into the chemistry and biological significance of plant secondary metabolites; examine both beneficial and poisonous effects of plant compounds in Western medicine and in other cultures around the world. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  and BIO 106   or equivalent, CHE 111 , and CHE 112 .
  
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    BIO 310 - Ecology

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on general principles of ecology including theory, classification of biota and field techniques. Central independent project with hypothesis test and poster presentation. (Alternate years. Offered spring semester.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108 .
  
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    BIO 312 - Animal Physiology

    Credits: 4
    Explores functions of living animals: how they eat, breathe, move and maintain physiological balance under environmental perturbations. Weekly laboratory. (Alternate years. Offered fall of odd years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 BIO 107 , and BIO 108 .
  
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    BIO 314 - Microbiology

    Credits: 4
    Surveys growth, metabolism, molecular genetics, immunology and ecology of bacteria and viruses. Weekly laboratory. (Offered fall semester.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 .
  
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    BIO 316 - Modern Genetics

    Credits: 4
    Examines genetics, covering classical, cellular, molecular, population, microbial and developmental genetics. Weekly laboratory. (Offered spring semester.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 BIO 107 BIO 108 .
  
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    BIO 320 - Cancer Biology

    Credits: 2
    Explores the history and biology of cancer through discussion of key historical milestones in scientific journal articles. Students will read and discuss key papers on a given milestone in our understanding of cancer as one of biology’s most challenging maladies. Other supplemental resources are used to provide insight into the human aspects of cancer.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 BIO 107 BIO 108 , or equivalent. Recommended: BIO 316  
  
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    BIO 321 - Molecular Cell Biology

    Credits: 4
    Surveys subcellular structures, composition and function at the molecular level. Emphasis given to regulatory mechanisms of genetic information flow from DNA to protein, cell-cell signaling and cell cycle control. Medical aspects of molecular biology discussed. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 BIO 107 , and BIO 108 , or equivalent.
  
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    BIO 331 - Marine Biology Institute

    Credits: 4
    Introduces marine organisms through lecture, laboratory and extensive field experiences. Emphasizes ecology, morphology and taxonomy. (Alternate years. Offered summer of odd years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107 BIO 108 , BIO 230 , or approval of instructor.
  
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    BIO 333 - Immunology

    Credits: 4
    Examines innate antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity. Incorporates recent information from molecular cell biology; major histocompatibility complex, T and B cell receptors and interactions, cytokines, tumor immunology. Weekly experimental labs. (Alternate years. Offered spring of odd years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 ,BIO 106 BIO 107 BIO 108 .
  
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    BIO 335 - Mammalogy

    Credits: 2
    Taxonomic and evolutionary relationships of mammals, considering the ecological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of wild mammal populations and communities. Laboratory focuses on diversity and morphological adaptations of mammal species, with special emphasis on species of New England, through laboratory identification and field trips. (Alternate years. Offered fall of odd years.) Lab fee.

  
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    BIO 340 - Field Ornithology

    Credits: 2
    Studies ecology, behavior and identification of birds; identification of winter and spring bird fauna by sight and sound. Includes field study of major habitats. (Alternate years. Offered spring of odd calendar years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107 BIO 108   
  
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    BIO 341 - Biochemistry

    Credits: 4
    Explores inner workings of cellular metabolism, starting with basic biomolecules such as amino acids and building to biosynthesis and maintenance of body homeostasis. Cross-listed as CHE 341   (Offered fall semester.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 211 , CHE 212 ; BIO 105 BIO 106 .
  
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    BIO 345 - Introduction to Public Health

    Credits: 2
    Explores public health issues in a global context and public health as a career, both in the U.S. and abroad.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 BIO 107 BIO 108 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIO 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Explores topic not regularly offered. Designated as repeated for credit; students may enroll more than once if topic changes.

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor.
    If a selected topic course is approved to fulfill a core theme, it will be identified as a Core option when offered.
  
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    BIO 381 - Independent Study

    Credits: 2 or 4


    Independent semester-long course in topic not available in existing curriculum; provides curricular enrichment. Limited availability subject to faculty workload. May require lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative average of 2.75, adequate background to support topic, permission of instructor, advisor, department chair and registrar.

     

     

  
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    BIO 410 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Thoracic, Abdominopelvic Cavities

    Credits: 2
    See KIN 410  course description. Cross-listed as KIN 410 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213 /BIO 213  and KIN 214 / BIO 214   with minimum grades of B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    BIO 411 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Neck, Back, Nervous System

    Credits: 2
    See KIN 411  course description. Cross-listed as KIN 411 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213 / BIO 213  and KIN 214 / BIO 214  with minimum grades of B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    BIO 412 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Upper Extremities

    Credits: 2
    See KIN 412  course description. Cross-listed as KIN 412 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 212 KIN 213 / BIO 213  and KIN 214 / BIO 214  with grades of at least B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    BIO 413 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Lower Extremities

    Credits: 2
    See KIN 413  course description. Cross-listed as KIN 413 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 212 KIN 213 / BIO 213  and KIN 214  /BIO 214  with grades of at least B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    BIO 425 - Internship

    Credits: Variable
    Supervised internship off campus combining on-the-job work experience with related academic study. Must be prearranged and approved by instructor and Registrar’s Office.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.
  
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    BIO 440 - Advanced Techniques in Ecology

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Focus on field techniques, including use of GPS and GIS, and on data analysis of community and population ecology data. Connections with local groups will lead to field project. Individual research. (Alternate years. Offered fall of even years.)

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 107 BIO 108 .
  
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    BIO 441 - Advanced Techniques in Ecology Lab

    Credits: 2
    Focus on field techniques, including use of GPS and GIS, and on data analysis of community and population ecology data. Connections with local groups will lead to field project. Individual research. Offered fall of even years

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 108   
  
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    BIO 471 - Research I

    Credits: Variable
    Opportunity for upper-class biology majors to pursue specific problem. Involves participation in ongoing research of biology staff or problem outlined by student before course begins. Maximum two terms. (Variable credit with maximum of 4 credits per term.)

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
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    BIO 472 - Research II

    Credits: Variable
    Opportunity for upper-class biology majors to pursue specific problem. Involves participation in ongoing research of biology staff or problem outlined by student before course begins. Maximum two terms. (Variable credit with maximum of 4 credits per term.)

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
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    BIO 491 - Senior Seminar: Topics in Biology

    Credits: 2
    Capstone course explores spectrum of subjects relevant to modern biological enterprise including bioethical, environmental and origins issues. Students prepare and present topical paper reviewing current literature on relevant subject and prepare résumé for career planning purposes. (Offered fall and spring each year.)

  
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    BIO 492 - Senior Seminar: Topics in Biochemistry

    Credits: 2

Creation Care Studies Program

  
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    CCS 101 - Te Reo Maori

    Credits: 1
    We might ask, “Why choose to learn te reo Maori (the Maori language) if one is only in New Zealand for four months?”  The answer lies in the close proximity of language and culture. Te reo Maori and tikanga Maori (Maori culture) are intertwined, and so learning te reo Maori allows students to access te ao Maori (the Maori world) and Maori world views. As students compare tikanga Maori with other cultures within New Zealand and overseas, they’ll develop an understanding of the central roles that language, culture, place and heritage play in shaping identity and in giving direction and meaning to life.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the Creation Care Study Program.
  
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    CCS 320 - Tropical Ecosystems

    Credits: 4
    Students explore Belize forest, stream and near-shore marine environments of coral reef, mangrove and sea grass. Study of various ecosystems helps students scientifically gain a broad understanding of global environmental issues.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the Creation Care Study Program.
  
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    CCS 321 - New Zealand Ecosystems

    Credits: 4
    Students explore New Zealand’s terrestrial and near-shore marine ecosystems. Students scientifically gain a broad understanding of global environmental issues.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the Creation Care Study Program.
  
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    CCS 322 - Environmental Literature

    Credits: 3
    Introduces students to landscape of environmental literature, both past and present, providing solid grounding in field. Through readings (including short story, essay and poetry), discussions and reflection, students consider what makes literature “environmental” and why this field was and is so important in shaping an earthly faith and worldview.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the Creation Care Study Program.
  
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    CCS 325 - God and Nature

    Credits: 4
    Through study of Scripture and other related texts, students explore theology of creation, biblical stewardship, questions of faith and science, and Christian responses to current environmental problems.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the Creation Care Study Program.
  
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    CCS 340 - Introduction to Sustainable Community Development

    Credits: 4
    Explores how knowledge of ecological systems, globalization, political economy and biblical worldview come together in development that is community-minded, just and ecologically sustainable. Through readings, lectures and field trips, students study complex issues in sustainable development such as nexus of poverty, environment, justice and practical challenges of sustainable community development.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the Creation Care Study Program.
  
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    CCS 425 - Internship

    Credits: 1-3
    Work experience in area of sustainable development.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the Creation Care Study Program.

Chemistry

  
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    CHE 100 - Introductory Seminar in Chemistry

    Credits: 0
    An introduction to the study of chemistry at Gordon College. Students will learn of the many avenues available beyond the normal classroom and laboratory curriculum. Students will actively participate in discussions related to research opportunities, off-campus study, internships, professional societies, outreach activities, and alternative careers for chemists. Numerous field trips will be included.

  
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    CHE 111 - Principles of Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    Presents fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry: stoichiometry; atomic structure; thermochemistry; elementary quantum theory; chemical periodicity; chemical bonding; molecular structure and geometry; properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions; kinetic theory; and phase equilibria. Laboratory emphasizes quantitative measurement and develops investigative techniques and ability to interpret results. Previous high school or introductory college chemistry course strongly recommended. Lab fee.

  
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    CHE 112 - Principles of Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    Continues presentation of fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry: chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, elementary thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Laboratory emphasizes quantitative measurement and develops investigative techniques and ability to interpret results. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 111  or equivalent.
  
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    CHE 205 - Introduction to the Discipline of Biochemistry

    Credits: 2
    This course builds on the first-year curriculum by allowing students to explore potential career paths within the discipline of biochemistry. The content of this course serves as a bridge between the first-year curriculum and more advanced courses in biochemistry. Students will be introduced to some of the main themes of biochemistry from the perspective of examining applications of those techniques. Students will be exposed to some of the current medical and industrial applications of biochemical research through field trips and by reading primary literature. Students will learn about key discoveries in biochemistry leading to major breakthroughs in the field. Students will also explore ethical issues regarding some of the applications of biochemistry. Cross-listed as BIO 205  

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105 BIO 106 CHE 111  CHE 112  
  
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    CHE 211 - Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    Considers importance of carbon chemistry in our lives and world, and emphasizes application of principles of green chemistry in this field. Surveys representative organic compounds; discusses alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, ethers, and alcohols, and the structure, properties, synthesis and reactions of these molecules. Lab focuses on development of basic macro and micro techniques common to organic chemistry. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 112  
  
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    CHE 212 - Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    Continues discussion of classes of organic molecules including aromatic and organometallic compounds, alcohols, ethers, amines and carbonyl compounds, with continued emphasis on applying principles of green chemistry in organic chemistry. Emphasizes elucidation of molecular structure via instrumental techniques such as IR and NMR. Laboratory builds upon techniques with additional preparative chemistry and with classification and identification of unknown compounds. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 211  
  
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    CHE 311 - Quantitative Analysis

    Credits: 4


    Analytic chemistry course surveys classical analytical applications of statistics, chemical equilibria and electrochemistry. Laboratory includes acid-base, precipitation, redox, potentiometry and complexation methods along with use of computer software to collect and analyze data. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s):    or permission of instructor

     

  
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    CHE 312 - Instrumental Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Analytic course introduces instrumental methods of quantitative and qualitative analysis, including chromatography (gas and liquid), spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, FTIR, AA, mass) and associated hyphenated techniques (gas chromatography mass spectrometry). Laboratory emphasizes environmental and bioanalytical applications. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 211   or permission of instructor.
  
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    CHE 315 - Physical Chemistry I

    Credits: 4
    Examines thermodynamics and kinetics. Thermodynamics topics: gas equations of state and kinetic theory of gases; laws of thermodynamics; entropy; free energy; chemical equilibrium; and phase equilibrium of one- and two-component systems. Kinetics topics: empirical chemical kinetics and reaction rate theory. Laboratory involves experiments in calorimetry and empirical kinetics. (Alternate years. Offered 2018-19) (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 112  and PHY 122 .
  
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    CHE 316 - Physical Chemistry II

    Credits: 4
    Considers quantum chemistry and spectroscopy. Topics include postulates of quantum mechanics, particle in a box, harmonic oscillator and vibrational spectra, rigid rotor and rotational spectra, vibration-rotation spectra, hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms, and atomic spectra. Laboratory demonstrates application of spectroscopic theory to actual molecular spectra. (Alternate years. Offered 2018-19.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 112  and PHY 122 .
  
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    CHE 320 - Biomembranes

    Credits: 4
    This course focuses on the structure-function relationship of biological membranes. We will explore the diversity of lipids through their chemical structure and the molecular principles that underlie the assembly into cell membranes. Introduction to various spectroscopic and thermoanalytical methods used to characterize lipid assembly size and morphologies, as well as dynamics of molecular organization and motions. The significance of membrane structure in conjunction with membrane protein channels, pore formation, transporters, receptors and signal transduction will be discussed as a means of further understanding biological processes. Other areas of discussion will include: lipid RAFTS, detergents and membrane solubilization, membrane fusion and curvature, small molecule partitioning, antimicrobial peptides, etc.

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 111 CHE 112 CHE 211 BIO 105 BIO 106  . Exceptions may be made in special circumstances; please see instructor.
  
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    CHE 322 - Molecular Modeling for Life Sciences

    Credits: 2
    Computer simulations play a central role in the discovery of new drug substances, so called in silico drug design. Molecular Modeling for Life Sciences surveys the modeling techniques used in modern pharmaceutical academic research and industry. Topics covered include: small molecule and protein structure prediction, protein-ligand binding, pharmacophore building, QSAR, in silico drug design, and cheminformatics. Students will gain practical experience using one of the state of the art biochemical modeling packages. Lab fee

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 111 CHE 112  
    Corequisite(s): CHE 211  
  
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    CHE 323 - Quantum Chemistry Modeling

    Credits: 2
    Quantum Chemistry Modeling explores the application of quantum mechanics to chemical systems. Quantum mechanics allows the detailed behavior of electrons within small molecules, bulk solids and surfaces to be examined. In this course students will learn the basics of ab initio (Hartree-Fock), Density Functional Theory (DFT) and semi-empirical modeling. The application of these simulations to the discovery and development of new catalytic materials will be considered. Students will gain practical experience of using state of the art materials modeling packages. Lab fee

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 111 , CHE 112 , MAT 122 , PHY 121  
  
  
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    CHE 371 - Selected Topics in Chemistry I

    Credits: 2
    Examines topics of instructor’s choice not covered elsewhere in curriculum. Recent topics include green chemistry, medicinal chemistry, computational organic chemistry, statistical mechanics and science and public policy. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic is different.

  
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    CHE 372 - Selected Topics in Chemistry II

    Credits: 2
    Examines topics of instructor’s choice not covered elsewhere in curriculum. Recent topics include green chemistry, medicinal chemistry, computational organic chemistry, statistical mechanics and science and public policy. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic is different.

  
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    CHE 391 - Junior Seminar I

    Credits: 0
    Explores theological, philosophical and ethical issues related to chemistry and physics. Also considers opportunities for postbaccalaureate education and employment.

  
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    CHE 392 - Junior Seminar II

    Credits: 0
    Explores theological, philosophical and ethical issues related to chemistry and physics. Also considers opportunities for postbaccalaureate education and employment.

  
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    CHE 411 - Inorganic Chemistry

    Credits: 4
    Advanced course emphasizing coordination chemistry of the transition metal elements. Topics include symmetry and group theory; vibrational spectroscopy; molecular orbital theory; structures, bonding, electronic spectra, reactions and mechanisms of coordination complexes; and structures and reactions of organometallic compounds. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): CHE 112 .
  
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    CHE 471 - Research I

    Credits: 1-4
    Research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science. Library searches, laboratory investigation, and written and oral reports may be required.

  
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    CHE 472 - Research II

    Credits: 1-4
    Research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science. Library searches, laboratory investigation, and written and oral reports may be required.

  
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    CHE 473 - Research III

    Credits: 1-4
    Ongoing research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science.

  
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    CHE 474 - Research IV

    Credits: 1-4
    Ongoing research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science.

  
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    CHE 475 - Research V

    Credits: 1-4
    Ongoing research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science.

  
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    CHE 476 - Research VI

    Credits: 1-4
    Ongoing research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science.

  
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    CHE 491 - Senior Seminar I

    Credits: 1
    Explores theological, philosophical and ethical issues related to chemistry and physics. Also considers opportunities for postbaccalaureate education and employment. Requires students to prepare and deliver oral presentations using presentation software.

  
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    CHE 492 - Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 1
    Explores theological, philosophical and ethical issues related to chemistry and physics. Also considers opportunities for postbaccalaureate education and employment. Requires students to prepare and deliver oral presentations using presentation software.

  
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    CHE 499 - Thesis

    Credits: 2
    This course is intended for students who have already completed substantial undergraduate work at Gordon College. In this course the student will write and defend an undergraduate thesis in cooperation with a faculty committee.


Communication Arts

  
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    COM 101 - Visual Storytelling

    Credits: 4
    Develops knowledge and skills in applying basic media storytelling structures and techniques (including documentary, public relations, advertising and scriptwriting) and basic visual design (including color theory, movement and composition).

  
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    COM 152 - Media and Society

    Credits: 4
    Examines how media of mass communication both reflect and influence our culture. Considers how knowledge of environment and models for social interaction are affected by mediated communication, and how financial and organizational structures of media influence content and approach.

  
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    COM 205 - Perspectives on Communication

    Credits: 4
    Examines foundational concepts and methods for understanding and evaluating communication with a focus on theory relevant to visual storytelling. Introduces how core sensibilities about responsible communication are developed through interacting with traditions of communication theory.

  
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    COM 217 - Introduction to Screenwriting

    Credits: 4
    Examines principles of screenwriting with constant practice. Students complete multiple short-format screenplays. Coursework includes extensive analysis of student work and established models.

    Prerequisite(s): COM 101  or ENG 212 .
  
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    COM 222 - Journalism

    Credits: 4
    Studies all facets of reporting news. Experience in techniques of interviewing, information gathering and writing news stories.

  
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    COM 241 - Introduction to Public Speaking

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the fundamental skills and preparation for presentational speaking. Students prepare and present 3 speeches: Informative, Persuasive and Special Occasion.

  
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    COM 242 - Interpersonal Communication

    Credits: 4
    Examines how communication functions in relationships of mutual influence. Based on understanding verbal and nonverbal skills, explores models for listening and responding, managing conflict, and developing and adjusting various kinds of relationships. (Not currently offered).

  
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    COM 248 - Intercultural Communication

    Credits: 4
    Studies communication dynamics of intercultural engagement. Explores how communication practices disclose and articulate cultural diversity. Emphasizes awareness of cultural values in interpersonal and mediated communication, toward the goal of reducing cultural misunderstandings and enhancing appreciative interaction in multicultural society.

  
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    COM 254 - Introduction to Production

    Credits: 4
    Introduces basic equipment, pre-through postproduction procedures and techniques, and aesthetic and narrative perspectives in digital video production. Students complete individual and group productions. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): COM 101 .
  
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    COM 271 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Topics not regularly taught but of interest to majors. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    COM 310 - Contemporary Communication Theories

    Credits: 4
    Surveys influential perspectives on communication developed during past 100 years. Examines social-scientific, humanistic and performative schools of thought on how symbolic action can be understood and adjusted. (Not currently offered).

    Prerequisite(s): COM 205  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COM 317 - Intermediate Screenwriting

    Credits: 4
    Builds on foundations of screenwriting with constant practice. Students work towards completion of feature length screenplay. Coursework includes extensive analysis of student work and established models.

    Prerequisite(s): COM 217 .
  
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    COM 320 - News Workshop

    Credits: 2
    This course is a seminar format that allows students interested in journalistic writing or other aspects of writing for the media, and management of news in a digital culture, to combine efforts in developing those student-directed skills.  Students will choose the area of investigation and then work with the instructor to develop that area.  Course may be repeated for up to 8 total credits toward the Communication Arts major.

    Prerequisite(s): COM 222  
  
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    COM 324 - Feature Writing

    Credits: 4
    Examines principles and practice in writing features and articles; rewriting process; how to interview, get stories, and get published. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): COM 222 .
  
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    COM 325 - Public Relations and Advertising

    Credits: 4
    Studies and practices many forms of advertising and public relations including social media, press releases, public service announcements, coverage memos, media alerts, features, backgrounders and presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): COM 101 , permission of instructor or department chair.
 

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