Apr 10, 2020  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020

Course Descriptions


 

French

  
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    FRE 493 - Seminar in African Studies I

    Credits: 2
    In-depth study of chosen areas of politics, literature and culture in Francophone Africa. Conducted in French. Designated as repeatable for credit if topic is different.  (Every third year)

  
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    FRE 494 - Seminar in African Studies II

    Credits: 2
    In-depth study of chosen areas of politics, literature and culture in Francophone Africa. Conducted in French. Designated as repeatable for credit if topic is different. (Every third year)


General Studies

  
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    GEN 110 - Information is the New Oil: Introduction to Information Literacy

    Credits: 2
    A theoretical and practical course offering students a framework for how information and knowledge is produced in society and organized by libraries and indexing systems. Designed to give students critical thinking abilities and skills needed to access and use information resources found in libraries and on the Internet. Students will develop strategies for finding, evaluating, synthesizing, and managing information by using the Jenks Library. (Formerly NON110).

  
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    GEN 111 - Introduction to Personal Finance

    Credits: 2
    Equips students from all disciplines to manage personal and family financial life in ways both faithful to biblical principles and financially sound. Course covers practical topics such as managing credit and debt, investing, planning for retirement, taxes, charitable giving, estate planning and insurance. Does not count for any majors, minors or concentrations in the department. (Formerly NON111)

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.
  
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    GEN 120 - Gordon After Dark

    Credits: 2
    An experiential course in which students encounter a variety of cultural events on the Gordon campus and examine them through personal reflection, engaged dialogue, active listening, and supplemental readings. This course helps students develop discernment regarding the demands on their attention inside and outside of Gordon and learn to make meaning amid these demands through evaluating the personal and communal benefits of co-curricular events. Occasional fees for events as necessary

  
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    GEN 171 - Selected Topics

    Credits: Variable
    Explores topic not regularly offered. Designated as repeatable for credit; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. Offered as needed. Fees as needed.

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor.
     
  
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    GEN 175 - Applications of Learning Theory

    Credits: 2
    Examines topics from learning theory such as memory, metacognition and higher order thinking, and explores their application to personal learning settings. (Formerly NON 175)

  
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    GEN 271 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2-4
    Topics not regularly taught. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. (Offered periodically.)

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor as applicable.
  
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    GEN 335 - Identity, Community & Vocation I

    Credits: 1-2
    This integrative seminar explores issues of identity, community and vocation, and different approaches to framing those issues. Students will engage some of life’s biggest questions (Who am I? Why am I here? What should I do with my life? What makes a life significant?) and learn to identify competing conceptual frameworks which have been employed in the Western tradition to raise and address those questions. The focus will be on theological, sociological and ethical thought. (Formerly NON 335)

    Prerequisite(s): Participation in a Living-Learning Community and approval from instructor.
  
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    GEN 336 - Identity, Community & Vocation II

    Credits: 1-2
    Building on GEN 335 , this integrative seminar explores issues of identity, community and vocation through the lenses of psychology and history. Practical questions of “What are my strengths, gifts and interests?” “What emergent challenges and opportunities mark our time in history?” and “How do we discern God’s call in connecting who we are with what’s going on in the world?” will drive the reading, reflection and discussion. (Formerly NON 336)

    Prerequisite(s):  , participation in a Living -Learning Community and approval from instructor
  
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    GEN 371 - Selected Topics: Upper Level

    Credits: Variable 2-4
    Topics not regularly taught. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. (Offered periodically.)

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor as applicable.

Geography

  
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    GEG 210 - Principles of Geography

    Credits: 2
    Instructs students to think geographically about the world. Covers historical development, terminology and major themes of geography; current geographical issues in world’s regions. Special emphasis placed on skill of teaching geography and geography’s role in education. (Alternate years.)


German

  
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    GER 101 - Beginning German I

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to German language and Germanic cultures with practice in four skills associated with language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. GER101 conducted primarily in German.

    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    GER 102 - Beginning German II

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to German language and Germanic cultures with practice in four skills associated with language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. GER102 conducted in German. Language placement score required.

    Prerequisite(s): Successful fulfillment of GER 101 .
    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    GER 201 - Intermediate German I

    Credits: 4
    Continued study and practice in German language and Germanic cultures through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Conducted in German. Offered occasionally. See department chair for more information.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 102 , placement score or equivalent.
  
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    GER 202 - Intermediate German II

    Credits: 4
    Continued study and practice in German language and Germanic cultures through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Offered occasionally. See department chair for more information.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 201 , placement score or permission of instructor.

Global Honors Institute

  
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    GHI 010 - Scholars Workshop

    Credits: 0
    Bi-weekly learning lab designed to introduce, develop and advance concepts, ideas and practices for extended undergraduate scholarship, leadership, and professional development, delivered in an engaging series of conversations, activities, projects and reflections.

    Prerequisite(s): A.J. Gordon Scholar
  
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    GHI 103 - Christian Liberal Arts and Human Flourishing

    Credits: 4


    First of three honors seminars designed to enable students to build an integrative framework for understanding themselves, their faith, and their education as a means for living honorable lives of Christ-centered leadership and service in a global context. Explores the intersection of Christian liberal arts education with identity, faith, and calling. Asks key questions like “What is the purpose of a Christian liberal arts education?” “What is human flourishing?” “How do faith and education contribute to that flourishing?”

     

    Prerequisite(s): Global Honors Scholars Program
    Fulfills COR 107  for students in the Global Honors Scholars program

  
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    GHI 105 - Global Engagement Seminar

    Credits: 4
    An honors seminar designed to introduce students to Christianity’s cross-cultural mandate; prepare them for informed, relevant, and redemptive cross-cultural relationship, and equip them for a life of service within the context of global engagement.

    Prerequisite(s): Global Honors Scholars Program
  
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    GHI 203 - Honor and Virtue Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Examines what it means to live a life of honor, as defined by the Scriptures and by the historic Christian traditions and practices knows as the virtues. Students will be introduced to various cultural and philosophical definitions of honor, analyzing these approaches even as they are encouraged to define “honor” for themselves. Potential challenges to the development of honor and virtue will also be discussed. This will culminate in an in-depth exploration of the three Theological Virtues and the four Cardinal Virtues as the keys to an embodied life of honor, with particular emphasis on how this relates to their own vocations and Christ-honoring lives of service.

    Prerequisite(s): Global Honors Scholars Program

History

  
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    HIS 115 - American History Survey

    Credits: 2
    Introduces main political, constitutional, social and economic developments in American history from time of discovery to present. Does not count toward history major or minor.

  
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    HIS 121 - Historical Perspectives on Culture, Belief and Civilization

    Credits: 4
    Examines culture building, development and change, and interaction of diverse peoples across a broad swath of history. Explores Christianity from its Middle Eastern roots through Renaissance/Reformation to global cultures of contemporary world in political, technological, social and cultural contexts. Investigates Christian traditions, missionary endeavors, reform movements, and relationships between adherents of different world religions. Introduces critical evaluation of historical evidence. Does not count toward history major or minor.

    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    HIS 213 - History of Egypt and the Ancient Near East in the Bronze Age

    Credits: 4
    Explores growth and interaction of first “international world” in Ancient West: Fertile Crescent, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Hittite Asia Minor, Minoan Crete, Mycenaean Greece. Examines fall of these cultures after 1200 B.C.; interconnections between biblical and Bronze Age history. Various readings from original sources.

  
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    HIS 214 - History of Ancient Greece

    Credits: 4
    Explores Greek history from Minoan and Mycenaean cultures through Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic ages. Examines place of Greek culture in world of Rome; Greek political and social experiments, art, cultural life, athletics, warfare. Various readings from original sources. (Alternate years.)

  
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    HIS 216 - History of Ancient Rome

    Credits: 4
    Surveys Roman political and cultural history from earliest Latin settlements through Etruscan and Republican periods to Roman Empire. Emphasizes origins of modern Western culture; multicultural, unified Mediterranean setting in which Christian Church emerged. Various readings from original sources.

  
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    HIS 219 - Medieval Europe

    Credits: 4
    Surveys European history fourth-14th centuries; transition from Mediterranean to European civilization, growth of the Church, revival of towns, Crusades, empire and feudal monarchies, scholasticism, Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture.

  
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    HIS 221 - Renaissance and Reformation Europe

    Credits: 4
    Studies 14th-16th centuries; changes in medieval institutions and ideas, rebirth of culture in Italy, role of art in society, Reformation movements within the Church and overseas expansion of Europe.

  
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    HIS 226 - Early Modern Europe, 1555-1789

    Credits: 4
    Studies origins of modern Europe including Scientific Revolution, royal absolutism, constitutionalism, religious wars, and Enlightenment. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    HIS 227 - Modern Europe, 1789-Present

    Credits: 4
    Studies French Revolution, 19th-century ideologies of liberalism, nationalism, socialism, and imperialism, 20th-century world wars, rise of Communism and Fascism, Holocaust, Cold War, decolonization, European unity, collapse of Communist bloc and Soviet Union, and emergence of multi-polar world. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    HIS 228 - America 1492-1865

    Credits: 4
    Explores American history including Age of Exploration, European colonization of North America, birth of American slavery, Native American relations, religious developments, American Revolution, new national government, market and industrial revolutions, reform and revivalism, the crisis over slavery, and the American Civil War.

  
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    HIS 229 - America 1865-Present

    Credits: 4


    Explores American history including post-Civil War Reconstruction, growth of industry, labor strife, Spanish-American War, progressive reform, World War I, 1920s, Great Depression, and New Deal, World War II, Cold War, Korean War, major Supreme Court decisions, civil rights movement, Vietnam War, 1960s social change, Watergate scandal, economic difficulties of 1970s, Reagan revolution and problems of post-Cold War superpower status, and roots of global “war on terrorism.” 

     

  
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    HIS 231 - Introduction to African American History

    Credits: 4
    Surveys history of Blacks on North American continent; African origins and background; history and problems of Afro-Americans in the United States from 17th century until present. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    HIS 239 - Modern American Evangelicalism

    Credits: 4
    This course recounts the history of American Evangelical thought and culture in the 19th and 20th centuries, giving particular attention to the rise of Fundamentalism and to its transformation into modern Evangelicalism.  One of the course’s goals is to place the theological and cultural ethos of institutions such as Gordon College into historical context. Major assignments include panel discussions of the readings and an Integrative Book Review (the final paper), on which students give a public presentation. (Alternate years)

    American History category
  
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    HIS 244 - World History: Globalisation and Modernity, 1500-Present

    Credits: 4
    This course aims to introduce students to a macro-historical narrative by considering the twin themes of global cross-cultural and social interaction as well as the idea of modernity and its consequences. The course contrasts the historical development of African, American, Asian, and European societies from 1500 to the present. While the course starts with brief pre-modern settings for each continent, by 1500 we already observe significant exchange; we will emphasize the continued rise of global interaction, particularly in terms of trade, political structures, social issues, and cross-cultural engagement.

    Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 , sophomore standing by the term course taken.
    Fulfills non-Western distribution category within the history major; core social science course.
  
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    HIS 245 - History of Africa

    Credits: 4
    Studies three major themes of sub-Saharan history: indigenous cultures, foreign influences (Arab and European) and emergence of modern nation states; interaction of these themes in contemporary Africa. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    HIS 247 - Britain and America in the Middle East

    Credits: 4
    Explores British and American involvement in modern Middle East, focusing on period since 1900. Significant attention given to Zionism and rebirth of Israel in 1948, the Arab- Israeli conflict, Iran hostage crisis, beginnings of anti-American terrorism and 9/11 Commission Report. (Alternate years.)

  
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    HIS 250 - History of Latin America

    Credits: 4
    Surveys Latin American experience from pre-Columbian days to present; formation of political institutions, pattern of economic development and role of religion and church. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    HIS 291 - International Seminar: History of Ancient and Modern Greek Culture and Christianity in the Aegean

    Credits: 4
    Summer study and travel program. See departmental information.

  
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    HIS 315 - Ancient Belief and the Earliest Christian Church

    Credits: 4
    Explores history of religious faiths, intellectual life and cultural transitions of Israel, Greece and Rome before and after the coming of Christianity. Surveys growth of Christian Church through breakup of Roman world. Emphasizes readings from original sources. (Alternate years.)

  
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    HIS 321 - American Thought and Society

    Credits: 4
    Surveys great texts by American social thinkers from Puritans to postmodernists. Writers include John Winthrop, Benjamin Franklin, R. W. Emerson, H. D. Thoreau, Mark Twain, William James, John Dewey and Richard Rorty. Themes include individual in relation to society and problem of cultural relativism. (Alternate years.)

  
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    HIS 330 - The European Enlightenment: Founding Ideas of the Modern World

    Credits: 4
    An historical survey of the 18th-century European intellectual movement known as the Enlightenment, placed in its political and social contexts but considered mainly in terms of its key ideas and debates among thinkers of that period.

    Prerequisite(s): HIS 121 , sophomore standing 
    Fulfills Early Modern and Modern Europe distribution category within the history major.
  
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    HIS 331 - History of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales

    Credits: 4
    Surveys region from end of Roman period to Reformation. Themes include Christianization, medieval kingdoms, constitutional developments, Reformation and church history, cultural achievements and gender roles. (Alternate years.)

  
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    HIS 332 - Modern Britain

    Credits: 4
    Examines British history, 1800-present, focusing on industrialization, Victorian society and culture, development of parliamentary government, two world wars and modern welfare state. Special emphasis on rise and fall of British Empire. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    HIS 335 - Modern Germany

    Credits: 4
    Introduces students to history of modern Germany, 1871 to present. Topics include national unification, World War I, Weimar and Nazi periods, Holocaust, World War II, postwar division, and reunification. (Alternate years.)

  
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    HIS 341 - Eastern Europe, Byzantium and the Caucasus

    Credits: 4
    Explores cultures and societies in Eastern Europe and Western Asia, including Balkans, Georgia, Armenia and Byzantine Empire from founding of Constantinople to emergence of Muscovy (fourth-15th centuries). Examines ethnic and religious identities, structure of political authority, literary and artistic expression, and life in rural and urban communities.

  
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    HIS 344 - Classical Islam and the Middle East

    Credits: 4
    Explores context for rise of Islam, its expansion, intellectual flourishing in Middle Ages, and encounters with Westerners during crusades. Special attention paid to religious, cultural, social and economic environment of early and medieval Islam and relationship of Islam and Christianity as Abrahamic religions. Students read and analyze the Qur’an, visit local mosque for Friday prayers, meet and interact with Muslims. (Alternate years.)

  
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    HIS 360 - Military History of the Ancient World

    Credits: 4
    Introductory study of national conflicts, arts of war and conflict management in ancient Mediterranean world, based on earliest military records of Egypt and Near East through Greece and Rome. No previous ancient history course required. Combines overview of most important ancient conflicts with practice in critique of strategy and conflict management, and costs of particular conflict choices (successful or unsuccessful) to participating cultures.

    Major category History of the Ancient and Classical World
  
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    HIS 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2-4
    Explores various historical themes or periods. Designated as repeatable with different topic.

  
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    HIS 378 - Evolution and Society

    Credits: 4
    Historical survey of modern biological evolution idea and its interactions with social thought, particularly in Britain and America. Covers Charles Darwin, his antecedents and his work; development of evolutionary thought up to 1960s; and recent controversies including creation science and intelligent design. Substantial attention given to interactions with earth and life sciences, biblical interpretation, and social and anthropological thought, including ideas about human evolution and race. (Alternate years)

  
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    HIS 381 - Independent Study

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Independent semester-long course in topic not available in existing curriculum; provides curricular enrichment. Limited availability subject to faculty workload. May require lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative average of 2.75, adequate background to support topic, permission of instructor, advisor, department chair and registrar.
  
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    HIS 390 - Public History and Museum Studies

    Credits: 4
    Explores professional applications of historical methodology to archives, museums, document conservation, government and corporate record management. Includes lectures by professionals in field, on-site observations and possible internships.

  
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    HIS 391 - Museum Management

    Credits: 4
    Introduces operations of a museum and challenges faced by contemporary museum administrators. Students study local museum operations, identify issues and challenges and evaluate museum’s response based on texts and readings from current field of public history.

    Prerequisite(s): HIS 390 .
  
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    HIS 425 - Internship

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Supervised internship in a library, archival or museum location combining on-the-job work experience with related academic study. Ordinarily involves 8-10 hours per week at off-campus field assignment. Must be prearranged and approved by instructor and Registrar’s Office.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.
  
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    HIS 471 - Research I

    Credits: 4
    Research on a topic of mutual faculty and student interest resulting in a history honors thesis. Oral presentation and defense of thesis as well as written paper required in spring term.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of department. Consult department chair.
  
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    HIS 472 - Research II

    Credits: 4
    Research on a topic of mutual faculty and student interest resulting in a history honors thesis. Oral presentation and defense of thesis as well as written paper required in spring term.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of department. Consult department chair.
  
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    HIS 491 - Advanced Seminar: American History

    Credits: 4
    Reading and research in American history using both historiographic and primary sources. Topics include Colonial America, Postwar Presidents, 1945-1974 and Post-Watergate Presidents, 1974-2000. Check with instructor. Designated as repeatable with different topic.

  
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    HIS 492 - Colloquium in Historiography

    Credits: 4
    Explores way humans have approached writing and understanding of history from Greco-Roman historians to contemporary schools of historical inquiry. Focus on worldviews of historians and ways worldview shapes perception of past and how the past is used to influence the present. Open to advanced students and junior and senior history majors.

  
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    HIS 493 - Advanced Seminar: Modern European History

    Credits: 4
    Readings and research in special topics in modern European history. Topics vary; check with instructor. Designated as repeatable with different topic.

  
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    HIS 494 - Advanced Seminar: Medieval and Early Modern History

    Credits: 4
    Reading and research on special topics of medieval and early modern history. Topics vary; check with instructor. Topics include: Desert Spirituality, Medieval Celts, Medieval Pilgrimage, Art and Spirituality in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages and Jews in the Medieval World. Designated as repeatable with different topic.

  
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    HIS 495 - Advanced Seminar: Ancient History

    Credits: 2
    Reading and research on special topics in ancient history. Two of these two-credit courses meet the requirement for senior research and writing project. Designated as repeatable with different topic. Topics include: Writing Ancient History, Ancient Celts, Citizenship in Antiquity, Travel, Trade and Education, History of Science, Technology and Medicine in the Ancient World.

  
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    HIS 496 - Advanced Seminar: Ancient History

    Credits: 2
    Reading and research on special topics in ancient history. Two of these two-credit courses meet the requirement for senior research and writing project. Designated as repeatable with different topic. Topics include: Writing Ancient History, Ancient Celts, Citizenship in Antiquity, Travel, Trade and Education, History of Science, Technology and Medicine in the Ancient World.


Health Professions

  
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    HLP 200 - Health Professions Seminar I

    Credits: 0
    Provides interaction between students interested in medicine and allied health and practicing physicians, residents in training, medical students, researchers and paramedical professionals; prepares premed students for study of medicine. Required of most health professions minors or concentrations, sophomore and junior years. Course fee.

  
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    HLP 201 - Health Professions Seminar II

    Credits: 0
    Provides interaction between students interested in medicine and allied health and practicing physicians, residents in training, medical students, researchers and paramedical professionals; prepares premed students for study of medicine. Required of most health professions minors or concentrations, sophomore and junior years. Course fee.

  
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    HLP 300 - Health Professions Seminar III

    Credits: 0
    Provides interaction between students interested in medicine and allied health and practicing physicians, residents in training, medical students, researchers and paramedical professionals; prepares premed students for study of medicine. Required of health professions minor or concentration, junior year. HLP 301  may be applied to biology elective requirements. Course fee.

    Prerequisite(s): HLP 200 , HLP 201 .
  
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    HLP 301 - Health Professions Seminar IV

    Credits: 2
    Provides interaction between students interested in medicine and allied health and practicing physicians, residents in training, medical students, researchers and paramedical professionals; prepares premed students for study of medicine. Required of health professions minor or concentration, junior year. HLP301 may be applied to biology elective requirements. May be taken for 1 credit at the discretion of the Health Professions director. Course fee.

    Prerequisite(s): HLP 200  , HLP 201  , HLP 300  

Innovation & Social Enterprise

  
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    ISE 291 - Developing Enterprises in Rwanda

    Credits: 4
    Introduces students experientially to complex social issues in a poor developing country and a diverse array of emerging models for addressing them.  Class sessions will be dedicated to the complex social issues and emerging solutions found in the nascent field of social enterprise and development to alleviate poverty.  Students will also have the chance to put their knowledge and compassion to use through service (similar to an intense, 2-day internship), while working indirectly and directly for the benefit of Rwandan development.

  
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    ISE 305 - Introduction to Social Enterprise

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the purpose and practicalities of entrepreneurial activity, the creative process that establishes new organizations (non-profit, business, hybrid, etc.). This course offers practical guidance for students from any major interesting in starting (or managing) an organization with an explicit social or environmental mandate. This course provides an overview of the central concepts of entrepreneurship, as segmented into the individual factors, institutional varieties and common challenges facing this dynamic process. These topics will be brought to life by case studies, discussion and group exercises that offer students the opportunity to use entrepreneurial thinking and wield enterprising power as relevant for animating their own personal convictions. This class will serve as inspiration and training ground for those curious to know if they can develop the creativity and determination necessary to start an organization.

  
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    ISE 306 - Innovation - Understanding How to Innovate

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to innovation, what it is and how to do it. This course offers practical guidance for students from any major interested in better understanding how innovation works, how products and services are built (invention), shared (marketing), and used to impact our world. Innovative thinking will be brought to life by human-centered design prescriptions, case studies, discussion, and group exercises that offer students the opportunity to develop their own innovative thinking and creative power for addressing real-world challenges. This class will serve as inspiration and training ground for those curious to know if they can develop the insight, creativity and determination necessary to innovate.

  
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    ISE 307 - Social Venture Challenge

    Credits: 2-3
    Offers a hands-on introduction to the purpose and practicalities of starting an organization for impact. This effort entails some mastery of the creative process of entrepreneurship for establishing new ventures (nonprofit, business, hybrid, etc). The focus of this course is participation in an annual Social Venture Challenge competition, one that offers practical guidance for students from any major interested in starting (or managing) a new venture. Through a series of workshops, meetings, mentor opportunities and hard work, this is also a class where students compete to win part of an annual cash prize. This class will serve as training ground for those curious to know if they can develop the creativity and determination necessary to launch their own venture. 2 credits is awarded for the course plus 1 additional credit if the student makes it to the final competition round. Course may be taken up to four times; maximum of two instances can apply to the Innovation & Social Enterprise Minor .

  
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    ISE 308 - Foundations of Nonprofit Organizations

    Credits: 4
    Delivers a practical introduction to the knowledge, skills and confidence needed in resourcing an NPO. You will learn about revenue streams and how they work; best practices associated with NPO management; how NPOs develop a revenue footprint; and how effectiveness is evaluated. You will practice handling objections, asking for gifts in person and via technology. You will develop listening skills, powerful questions and resilience in the process of fundraising and friend-raising. The class also focuses on the practical “ins and outs” of starting a nonprofit organization (organizational management, strategic planning, marketing, working with employees, filing for 501c3 status, board development, etc.) and finances (budgets, accounting, financial statements, 990, etc.).

  
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    ISE 425 - Internship

    Credits: 4
    Internship applicable to the Innovation & Social Enterprise minor.


Interdisciplinary Christian Studies

  
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    ICS 207 - Discipleship and Vocation in the Gospel of Mark

    Credits: 2
    This course examines the themes of discipleship and vocation through the lens of Mark’s Gospel, with particular reference to its historical and cultural context, theological background and message, and narrative styles and themes.

  
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    ICS 226 - Identity, Community, Vocation

    Credits: 2
    This two credit, integrative seminar explores issues of identity, community, and vocation, drawing upon philosophical, sociological, and theological readings. Students will also design personally tailored research plans for exploring their skills and sense of calling and then conduct their research alongside their progress through course readings and lectures.

  
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    ICS 228 - Wisdom and Worldview in the Book of Proverbs

    Credits: 2
    The course is founded on the assumption that people who lived almost three millennia ago are enough like us that their proverbial wisdom has value for us today. Thus, we explore their ideas about the good life, death, faith, education and knowledge, value, desire, culture, vocation, friendship, selfhood, suffering, politics, justice, ethics, and law.

  
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    ICS 240 - Biblical and Cultural Hermeneutics Language and Interpretation

    Credits: 2
    This course provides an introductory study of hermeneutics and the philosophy of language with a particular interest in interpretation in the church, studying the turn in recent Western philosophy away from problems of knowing (the “epistemological project”) toward those of language and interpretation.


Jerusalem and Athens Forum

  
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    JAF 291 - International Seminar In Italy

    Credits: 4
    This new international seminar combines the Great Books, Socratic approach of Gordon College’s Jerusalem and Athens Forum  (JAF) honors program with the emphasis of the Gordon IN Orvieto  semester program of experiencing art, architecture, and literature in situ-in their original settings. Readings and topics vary year to year, but are generally drawn from the late medieval, Renaissance and Reformation periods. Excursions to Rome, Florence, Siena, among other places, are typically part of the program.  

    Prerequisite(s): Successful application into program and submission of all international program paperwork through the Global Education Office. 
    Fulfills core fine arts option
    History major distribution: One of History of the Ancient and Classical World or History of Medieval Europe
  
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    JAF 301 - Tradition: From Antiquity to the Enlightenment

    Credits: 6
    Readings include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Dante, Shakespeare, Erasmus, Luther, Teresa of Avila, Milton, Bunyan and more. See core notes below. See Jerusalem and Athens Forum  under Honors Programs .

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite(s): Sophomore status or higher and successful application into program. 
    With JAF 302 , can fulfill select common and thematic core courses, and core literature requirement. See JAF 302 ​ .
  
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    JAF 302 - Modernity: From the Enlightenment to the Present

    Credits: 6
    Readings include Alexis de Tocqueville, Dostoyevsky, J. H. Newman, Leo XIII, C. S. Lewis, Simone Weil, Flannery O’Connor, Martin Luther King and more. See Honors Programs  for description.

    Prerequisite(s): JAF 301 .
    On completion of JAF 301  and JAF 302  , students may petition to have the courses fulfill the HIS 121   and/or PHI 118  core requirements. See program director.

Kinesiology

  
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    KIN 112 - Introduction to Human Movement Studies

    Credits: 4
    Provides scientific perspective to study of human movement with emphasis on mechanical, neurological and physiological bases of human movements in activities of daily living and exercise. Addresses vocation as Christian calling and defines areas of professional practice in kinesiology. Open to majors only in fall; open for majors and nonmajors in spring.

  
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    KIN 212 - Musculoskeletal Anatomy

    Credits: 2
    Examines human musculoskeletal structure and function; muscle origin, insertion and action at joints. Introduces principles of lever action and mechanics of motion from applied, clinical perspective.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213 .
  
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    KIN 213 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    Credits: 4
    Examines structure and function of human body. Emphasizes organ systems: skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Weekly laboratory. Cross-listed as BIO 213 . Lab fee.

  
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    KIN 214 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    Credits: 4
    Examines structure and function of human body. Emphasizes organ systems: skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary and reproductive. Weekly laboratory. Cross-listed as BIO 214   Lab fee.

  
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    KIN 240 - Orthopedic Injuries across the Life Span

    Credits: 4
    Examines orthopedic injuries from clinical perspective including evaluation techniques and interpretation as well as treatment and rehabilitative exercises pertinent across life span.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 212 .
  
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    KIN 280 - Medical Missions in the Developing World

    Credits: 2
    Explores the medical and healthcare issues facing those in the developing world and the role of foreign NGOs and medical missions in helping to provide services in the context of the countries’ political and social structures.

  
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    KIN 291 - Health and Healthcare in the Developing World

    Credits: 2
    Health and Healthcare in the Developing World (2 credit) is an International Seminar designed to give Gordon students a view into the public perception of disability and disease in developing countries, and how people are cared for through their healthcare systems and local NGOs. We will spend Quad 2 on campus (The Role of Medical Missions in the Developing World, 2 credit) discussing these issues globally and then travel to Belize for 10 days in January to see firsthand how they play out in that country. Variable

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 280  
  
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    KIN 310 - Motor Control and Learning

    Credits: 4
    Examines concepts and principles related to the nature of motor control and movement skill acquisition. Presents theoretical frameworks for motor control and learning and motor development.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213  or permission of instructor.
  
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    KIN 320 - Biomechanics of Human Movement

    Credits: 4
    Principles of classical mechanics used to describe, analyze and assess human motion. Considers experimental techniques, including motion capture systems, EMG and force platforms to study human movement. Concepts of data processing, mechanical modeling, and energy and power analysis applied to sport and rehabilitation contexts. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213 , PHY 111  or PHY 121  or by permission. Weekly laboratory.
    Corequisite(s): May be taken concurrently with PHY 111  or PHY 121 .
  
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    KIN 323 - Foundations of Exercise Physiology

    Credits: 4
    Examines human systems of energy delivery and utilization; emphasizes methods by which these systems may be altered through physical training and dietary manipulation. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 214  or permission of instructor. Weekly laboratory.
  
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    KIN 350 - Disorders of Voluntary Movement

    Credits: 4
    Examines role of neurological structures in motor system and sensory impairments. Emphasis on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, assessment and treatment of various neurological disorders.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213  or by permission of instructor.
  
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    KIN 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2-4
    Theoretical and applied topics in kinesiology not regularly taught. Designated as repeatable if topic changes.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites may apply depending on topic.
  
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    KIN 410 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Thoracic, Abdominopelvic Cavities

    Credits: 2
    Through course lectures and laboratory dissection experiences students will develop an understanding of human anatomy as a basic science and will learn to apply this understanding to clinical and health-related concepts. Emphases on the tissues and organs of the thoracic and abdominopelvic cavities. Cross-listed as BIO 410 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213 / BIO 213  and KIN 214 / BIO 214  with a minimum grade of B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    KIN 411 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Neck, Back, Nervous System

    Credits: 2
    Through course lectures and laboratory dissection experiences students will develop an understanding of human anatomy as a basic science and will learn to apply this understanding to clinical and health-related concepts. Emphases on the tissues and organs of the neck, back and nervous system. Cross-listed as BIO 411 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 213 / BIO 213  and KIN 214  / BIO 214  with a minimum grade of B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    KIN 412 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Upper Extremities

    Credits: 2
    Through course lectures and laboratory dissection experiences students will develop an understanding of human anatomy as a basic science and will learn to apply this understanding to clinical and health-related concepts. Emphases on the tissues and organs of the  tissues, muscles and joints of the upper extremities. Cross-listed as BIO 412 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 212 KIN 213 / BIO 213  and KIN 214 / BIO 214  with a minimum grade of B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    KIN 413 - Advanced Human Anatomy: Lower Extremities

    Credits: 2
    Through course lectures and laboratory dissection experiences students will develop an understanding of human anatomy as a basic science and will learn to apply this understanding to clinical and health-related concepts. Emphases on the tissues and organs of the  tissues, muscles and joints of the  lower extremities. Cross-listed as BIO 413 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 212 KIN 213 / BIO 213  and  KIN 214 / BIO 214  with a minimum grade of B minus (B-) in each; junior standing.
  
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    KIN 420 - Clinical Gait Biomechanics

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to various biomechanical methods used to recognize and understand typical and pathological gait. Includes visual assessment, analysis of kinematics and kinetics, and musculoskeletal modeling and simulation. Introduces technological advances used in gait rehabilitation and enhancement.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 212  
  
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    KIN 423 - Clinical Exercise Physiology

    Credits: 4
    Examines preventive and rehabilitative role of exercise training in selected chronic diseases. Training in principles and procedures of graded exercise testing and prescription. Also includes study of electrocardiography and its role in diagnostic testing for cardiovascular disease.

    Prerequisite(s): KIN 323  or permission of instructor. MAT 220  or approved statistics course recommended.
  
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    KIN 425 - Internship

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Internship experiences in field appropriate to student’s concentration. Learning plan must be completed with departmental faculty supervisor and approved in advance by department chair and registrar.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.
  
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    KIN 450 - Neurophysiologic Bases for Movement

    Credits: 4
    Study of central and peripheral neural structures involved in control and coordination of human action. Neurological diseases affecting movement are considered. Lab fee.

    Corequisite(s): KIN 310  or permission of instructor. Weekly Laboratory.
  
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    KIN 491 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 2
    Capstone experience for majors involving either a research project, service learning project or literature review paper.  Students are provided a framework under which they can demonstrate knowledge and appreciation for human movement as well as the critical thinking, scientific inquiry and communication skills acquired in their academic experience.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.
  
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    KIN 492 - Research

    Credits: 1-4
    Full-semester research project directed by departmental faculty.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of supervising faculty.
 

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