Jul 12, 2020  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Philosophy

  
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    PHI 315 - Ethics

    Credits: 4
    Surveys and critiques key theories in Western philosophical tradition from Plato to pragmatism. Meta-reflections offered on relevance of such theories for practical experience as Christians.

  
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    PHI 317 - Philosophy and Literature

    Credits: 4
    Compares and contrasts strengths and weaknesses of philosophy and literature for addressing universal questions and problems; e.g., Is the good life possible? Is there anything I can be certain of? What constitutes self-identity? What does it mean to understand? (Alternate years.)

  
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    PHI 318 - Philosophy of Law

    Credits: 4
    Introduces basic terminology, themes and issues in Western legal theory by examining essays and case studies. Required for Pre-Law concentration. (Alternate years.)

  
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    PHI 325 - Eastern Philosophy and Religion

    Credits: 4
    Studies fundamental philosophical and religious tenets of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism. Engages primary texts to develop introductory understanding of important belief systems while also continuing dialogue between these ideas and major tenets of Western monotheism and Christianity in particular.

  
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    PHI 333 - Late Modernity: Kant through Heidegger

    Credits: 4
    Traces philosophical thought from Kant through Heidegger; development of such major movements as idealism, romanticism, existentialism, pragmatism, process philosophy, analytic philosophy and neo-Thomism. (Alternate years.)

  
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    PHI 340 - Philosophy of Women: Women’s Knowing, Doing, Being

    Credits: 4
    Inquires into historical use of term “woman” and its significance for us today. First part of course acquaints students with selected canonical Western philosophical texts about the nature of women; second part engages with theoretical writings by contemporary feminist thinkers who challenge such traditional readings. (Alternate years.)

  
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    PHI 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Explores topic not regularly offered. Designated as repeatable for credit; students may enroll more than once if topic changes.

  
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    PHI 411 - Epistemology

    Credits: 4
    Examines classical and contemporary theories of knowledge and truth. Topics include definition of “knowledge,” justification of beliefs, epistemic norms, cognition, subject and object, and recent controversies such as foundationalism vs. post-foundationalism, internalism vs. externalism, and realism vs. anti-realism.

  
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    PHI 413 - Metaphysics

    Credits: 4
    Studies nature of and warrants for metaphysical systems. Includes several major topics.

  
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    PHI 415 - American Pragmatism

    Credits: 4
    Addresses themes of truth, knowledge, the self, democratic practice, ethics, and religious experience in the thought of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, John Dewey, Richard Rorty, Cornel West and others. (Alternate years.)

  
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    PHI 425 - Internship

    Credits: 2-4
    Supervised internship in an appropriate setting combining on-the-job experience with related academic study. Must be prearranged and approved by instructor and Registrar’s Office. 

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.
  
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    PHI 440 - Gender Today: Philosophical and Theological Perspectives

    Credits: 4
    Seminar presenting current research in feminist theory and theology on issues of gender identity.

    Prerequisite(s): At least one 200-level or higher course in philosophy, theology or sociology.
  
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    PHI 471 - Research

    Credits: 2
    Individual research for senior honors thesis in philosophy.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of supervising faculty member.
  
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    PHI 493 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Use multiple research tools to find recent work in philosophy, present findings to class, and write a research paper from these findings.


Physics

  
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    PHY 103 - Introduction to General Shop

    Credits: 2
    Orientation course to the Physics-Engineering Shop. Course provides basic skills to enable safe and effective use of the shop. Emphasis on safety, proper technique and working manually in wood. Project-based in approach. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
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    PHY 104 - Technical Drawing and Design

    Credits: 2
    A project-based course that teaches technical drawing and design, familiarizes students with CAD and the basics of proper engineering design, and reviews proper shop safety. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 103  and one of  PHY 111 , PHY 121 PHY 125 , and instructor permission.
  
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    PHY 105 - Technical Machining and Prototyping

    Credits: 2
    A project-based course that teaches shop safety, machining and prototyping. Course includes instruction in the use of hand tools and power tools such as a band saw, drill press, lathe, manual and introduction to CNC milling machines. Students learn fixturing and gauge measuring techniques. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 104  and permission of instructor.
  
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    PHY 111 - General Physics I

    Credits: 4
    Noncalculus introduction to physics including classical mechanics, wave motion, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism and optics. Separate laboratory section required. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): High school algebra and trigonometry.
  
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    PHY 112 - General Physics II

    Credits: 4
    Noncalculus introduction to physics including classical mechanics, wave motion, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism and optics. Separate laboratory section required. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): High school algebra and trigonometry. 
  
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    PHY 121 - Introductory Physics I

    Credits: 4
    Calculus-based introduction to physics including classical mechanics, fluid physics, and thermodynamics. Three 50 minute lectures and one recitation per week. Separate laboratory section required. Lab fee.

    Corequisite(s): MAT 121  or equivalent.
  
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    PHY 122 - Introductory Physics II

    Credits: 4
    Calculus-based introduction to physics including waves, optics, electric and magnetic fields, and electric circuits. Three 50 minute lectures, one recitation per week. Separate laboratory section required. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s):   
    Corequisite(s): MAT 122  and MAT 222 , or equivalent.
  
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    PHY 125 - Introduction to Engineering and the Applied Sciences

    Credits: 4
    Overview of engineering and applied science professions, concentrating on common engineering themes; emphasis on experimental and problem-solving skills including introduction to MATLAB and LabView. Separate laboratory section required. Lab fee.

  
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    PHY 130 - First-Year Physics Seminar

    Credits: 2
    Conceptual survey of some “big ideas” in physics such as relationship between conservation laws and symmetry, entropy, wave-particle duality, quantum theory, relativity theory and astroparticle physics. includes introduction to MATLAB and Python.

  
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    PHY 171 - Selected Topics

    Credits: Variable
    Explores topic not regularly offered. Designated as repeatable for credit; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. Offered as needed. Fees as needed.

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor.
     
  
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    PHY 200 - Astronomy

    Credits: 4
    Important topics in modern astronomy for both science and nonscience majors including light, telescopes, planets, normal stars, pulsars, black holes, galaxies, quasars and origin of universe.

  
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    PHY 211 - Statics

    Credits: 4
    Systems under influence of external forces; topics include rigid body equilibrium, distributed forces, structures, forces in beams and cables, friction, virtual work; includes wide variety of examples. Separate laboratory section required. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 121 , PHY 125 .
    Corequisite(s): MAT 122 .
  
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    PHY 221 - Mathematical Methods in Physics I

    Credits: 4
    Complex algebra, vector algebra, vector calculus including orthogonal coordinate systems and tensor notation, linear equations and transformations, Fourier series and transforms. Three 50 minute lectures, one recitation per week. Cross-listed as MAT 221 .

    Prerequisite(s): MAT 122  
  
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    PHY 225 - Electronics

    Credits: 4
    Analysis of analog circuits including complex algebra and phasor methods, network theorems, resonance, electronic devices, power supplies, operational amplifiers and transistor amplifiers and oscillators. Includes introduction to digital electronics. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 226 .

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122 .
    Corequisite(s): PHY 226  
  
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    PHY 226 - Electronics Laboratory

    Credits: 2
    An introduction to AC circuit analysis and analog electronics, including complex algebra and phasor methods, network theorems, resonance, devices, power supplies, op amps, transistor amplifiers and oscillators. Also an introduction to digital electronics, digital logic and microcontrollers. Extensive use of circuit simulation software. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 225 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122  
    Corequisite(s): PHY 225  
  
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    PHY 261 - Introduction to Materials Science

    Credits: 4
    An introduction to the field of materials science, including an in-depth examination of the interplay between processing, microstructure, properties and application and how advancements in materials technology have driven the evolution of human history. Hands-on experience with processing and property determination of various materials in lab. Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122  
    Corequisite(s): PHY 262  PHY 221  
  
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    PHY 262 - Introduction to Materials Science Lab

    Credits: 2
    A laboratory exploration of various materials, their processing, properties and microstructure. Microstructural characterization, x-ray diffraction, electrical, acoustic and mechanical characterization. Processing techniques including polymerization, metal melting and casting, 3-d printing and thermal evaporation. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122  
    Corequisite(s):  PHY 261  PHY 221  
  
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    PHY 283 - Modern Physics

    Credits: 4
    Special relativity, quantization, wavelike properties of particles, Schrödinger’s equation; introductory atomic, molecular, nuclear and particle physics. Three 50 minute lectures, one recitation per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 284 .

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122 .
    Corequisite(s): PHY 284  PHY 221 .
  
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    PHY 284 - Modern Physics Laboratory

    Credits: 2
    Experimental exploration of the breakdown of classical physics, including relativistic effects and various quantum effects such as wave-particle duality, quantum analogs in acoustics, and spectroscopy. Also an introduction of frequency-based measurements such as Fourier and lock-in techniques. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 283 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122  
    Corequisite(s):  PHY 283  PHY 221  
  
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    PHY 293 - Mechanics

    Credits: 4
    Newtonian mechanics including study of conservation theorems, gravitation, oscillations, calculus of variations, Hamilton’s Principle, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics, central force motion, multiparticle systems, noninertial frames, rigid bodies. Three 50 minute lectures, one recitation per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 294 .

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 121 .
    Corequisite(s): PHY 294  PHY 221 .
  
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    PHY 294 - Mechanics Laboratory

    Credits: 2
    An experimental exploration of mechanics, including oscillating systems, chaotic systems, rigid body motion, noninertial systems, gravitation, scattering and more. Also includes treatment of sources of noise in experimental systems. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 293 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 121  
    Corequisite(s):  PHY 293  PHY 221  
  
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    PHY 313 - Mathematical Methods in Physics II

    Credits: 4
    Introduces partial differential equations, special functions and polynomials, complex analysis, Monte Carlo methods. Cross-listed as MAT 313 . (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 221 .
  
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    PHY 328 - Strength of Materials

    Credits: 4
    Stress and strain, beam deflection, thin-walled members, columns, and survey of general classes of materials with objective of equipping students to analyze load-bearing structures; includes wide variety of examples. Laboratory included. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 211 .
    Corequisite(s): MAT 225 .
  
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    PHY 338 - Electric and Magnetic Fields I Lab

    Credits: 2
    An experimental exploration of electrostatics, magnetostatics, dielectric and magnetic materials, inductive effects and other non-radiative implications of Maxwell’s equations. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 339 . Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122  
    Corequisite(s): PHY 221  PHY 339  
  
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    PHY 339 - Electric and Magnetic Fields I

    Credits: 4
    Theory of electrostatics; dielectrics; magnetostatics; dia-, para- and ferromagnetism; induction; Maxwell’s equations. Three 50 minute lectures, one recitation per week. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 338 .

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122 .
    Corequisite(s): PHY 338  PHY 221 .
  
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    PHY 340 - Electric and Magnetic Fields II

    Credits: 4
    Theory of electrodynamics applied to electromagnetic waves, radiation and relativity. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 339 .
  
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    PHY 341 - Optics

    Credits: 4
    Fundamentals of geometrical and physical optics including reflection, refraction, aberrations, interference, diffraction, polarization and dispersion. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122  PHY 221 .
  
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    PHY 342 - Optics Lab

    Credits: 2
    Geometric and physical optics, optical instrumentation, Gaussian wave propagation, lasers, electrooptic and other nonlinear effects. Offered in alternation with PHY340. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 122  PHY 221  
  
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    PHY 355 - Quantum Mechanics

    Credits: 4
    Matrix formulation of quantum mechanics as applied to a variety of systems, including spin systems, identical particles, perturbation theory, scattering. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 283 .
  
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    PHY 371 - Selected Topics in Physics

    Credits: 1-4
    Topics which are not offered elsewhere in curriculum. Designated as repeatable when different topic. (Offered upon sufficient demand.) Lab fee when appropriate.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
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    PHY 372 - Thermal Physics

    Credits: 4
    Statistical properties of systems composed of large numbers of particles including classical and quantum distribution functions, thermodynamic concepts and functions, kinetic theory of gases, lattice models and percolation. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 283 PHY 293 
  
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    PHY 391 - Junior Seminar I

    Credits: 0
    Explores current research, postbaccalaureate education and employment, theological, philosophical and societal issues in physics.

  
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    PHY 392 - Junior Seminar II

    Credits: 0
    Explores current research, postbaccalaureate education and employment, theological, philosophical and societal issues in physics.

  
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    PHY 462 - Solid State Physics

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to the physics of systems in the solid state, including bonding, structure, reciprocal space, band theory, transport phenomena, lattice vibrations, magnetism and semiconductors. Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 261 , PHY 283 , PHY 339 PHY 372 .  Recommended: PHY 355  
  
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    PHY 471 - Research I

    Credits: 1-4
    Research under supervision of faculty member. Lab fee when appropriate.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of supervising faculty member.
  
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    PHY 472 - Research II

    Credits: 1-4
    Research under supervision of faculty member. Lab fee when appropriate.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of supervising faculty member.
  
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    PHY 473 - Research III

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Research under supervision of faculty member. Lab fee when appropriate.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of supervising faculty member.
  
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    PHY 474 - Research IV

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Research under supervision of faculty member. Lab fee when appropriate.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of supervising faculty member.
  
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    PHY 491 - Senior Seminar I

    Credits: 1
    Explores current research, postbaccalaureate education and employment, theological, philosophical and societal issues in physics.

  
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    PHY 492 - Senior Seminar II

    Credits: 1
    Explores current research, postbaccalaureate education and employment, theological, philosophical and societal issues in physics.


Political Science

  
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    POL 104 - American National Politics

    Credits: 4
    Critically examines basic commitments, institutions and processes of American politics; engages contemporary political debate; focuses on Constitution, political culture, interest groups, parties, Congress, Presidency and Supreme Court.

  
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    POL 105 - Power and Justice: Perspectives on Political Order

    Credits: 2
    Explores basic political concepts, systems and problems in worldwide context. Encourages development and use of Christian worldview to transcend existing modes of understanding and practicing politics.

  
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    POL 106 - International Relations

    Credits: 4
    Studies relations among nations, politics of war and peace, elements and limits of national power, issues of hunger, development and human rights. Emphasizes American involvement in world affairs; examines Christian options.

  
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    POL 210 - Introduction to Comparative Politics

    Credits: 4
    Provides overview of basic concepts and theoretical approaches used to compare political systems, exploring distinctive and similar characteristics of various states (industrialized, authoritarian and developing). Government, culture and development of seven country cases are evaluated: Britain, Germany, Japan, Russia, China, India and South Africa.

  
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    POL 213 - Political Communication: Votes, Groups and Media

    Credits: 4
    Examines political communication in American politics from empirical and normative perspectives, focusing on campaigns and elections, public opinion, mass media, interest groups and political parties.

    Prerequisite(s): POL 104  or course in communications, or permission of instructor.
  
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    POL 214 - American Domestic Policy

    Credits: 4
    Examines policy making from agenda setting to implementation and evaluation of policies; students explore specific domestic policy interests.

    Prerequisite(s): POL 104  or permission of instructor.
  
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    POL 217 - American Constitutional Law

    Credits: 4
    Surveys development of American constitutional law from historical perspective using case-analysis approach. Emphasizes civil liberties and federal-state relations.

    Prerequisite(s): Course in American politics or American history, or permission of instructor.
  
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    POL 219 - Politics of the Developing World

    Credits: 4
    Explores political-economic situation in countries typically described as “developing.” Using case studies, issues related to structures, markets and societal activity are examined. Emphasizes politics of developmental strategies and place of Christian worldviews.

  
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    POL 223 - Theories of Politics

    Credits: 4
    Explores major themes in Western tradition from classical and modern political thought. Explores central concepts of state and citizen, and considers major traditions in Christian political thought. Cross-listed as PHI 223 

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.
  
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    POL 240 - Politics of Western Europe

    Credits: 4
    Explores political institutions and problems common to democracies of Western Europe; institutions of parliamentary democracy, micro-nationalism, major political forces, electoral systems and European Union; consociational democracy as alternative to Anglo-American majoritarian democracy.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100–level politics course.
  
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    POL 246 - International Diplomacy: The Model United Nations

    Credits: 2
    Students serve as U.N. representatives of country at National Model United Nations Program at Harvard University; extensive economic, political, social, cultural and scientific reports required on national and international concerns of country delegation represents. Includes intensive preparation in parliamentary procedures and debate. Repeatable for credit.  Up to 4 credits may be applied to the major; additional credit will be applied to free electives. Class fee: $300.

  
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    POL 310 - American Foreign Policy

    Credits: 4
    Examines factors shaping international behavior of United States from end of World War II to present; analytical importance of international system, domestic interest groups, governmental actors, public opinion and ideology; dilemma of reconciling moral principles with exercise of world power.

    Prerequisite(s): Rising sophomore;  .
  
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    POL 312 - Justice

    Credits: 4
    Explores complexities of justice in pluralist society, focusing on United States but with connections to global community. Examines selected Christian and non-Christian theories of justice, both classical and contemporary, and considers several specific debates concerning pursuit of justice in contemporary society.

  
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    POL 320 - Women and Politics

    Credits: 4
    Overview of relationship between gender and politics in American and international context. Focuses on role of gender in defining and shaping politics, political behavior and public policy; political socialization, mobilization and participation of women; formation, leadership and efficacy of women’s movements (feminist and nonfeminist); and various ways in which women, as political actors and theorists, have challenged and redefined “politics as usual.”

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level course in politics.
  
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    POL 322 - American Political Thought

    Credits: 4
    Are all Americans liberals? Examines American political tradition, using primary documents from Colonial period through present, with special emphasis on Federal Convention of 1787 and Christian critique of contemporary liberalism.

    Prerequisite(s): POL 104 .
  
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    POL 324 - Politics of Latin America

    Credits: 4
    Considers development and political governance in unique historical and cultural context of Latin America. Course combines discussion of history and theory with study of individual countries. Included are analyses of regime change, social movements and U.S. foreign policy in region.

  
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    POL 325 - Congress and the Presidency

    Credits: 4
    Examines legislative and executive branches of American national government; includes elections, representation, presidential leadership, congressional reform, role of parties, interest groups and bureaucracy in legislative and executive politics; impact of Constitution on presidential-congressional relations.

    Prerequisite(s): POL 104 .
  
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    POL 329 - Modern Political Theory

    Credits: 4
    A survey of major philosophers in Western political thought from Machiavilli to Marx.  A central focus is on development of major political concepts (natural rights, popular sovereignty, constitutionalism, revolution) and theoretical questions, including the nature of politics, the relation between faith and theory, and sources of political authority. Cross-listed as PHI 329.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing.
  
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    POL 348 - Theories of International Relations

    Credits: 4
    Critical analyses of leading schools of thought in international relations and their policy implications for major topics such as war, peace and cooperation. Approaches considered include, among others, realism, Marxism, neoliberalism and constructivism.

    Prerequisite(s): POL 106 .
  
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    POL 349 - Religion and International Affairs

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on contemporary relationships between religion and public life internationally, recognizing religion’s contribution to conflict and oppression and to positive political change. Compares church-state relationships; analyzes relationship of religion to conflict, cooperation, society and diplomacy; surveys religion and politics in multiple regions; and reviews theories of religion’s role in society.

  
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    POL 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2-4
    Explores topics not regularly taught. Designated as repeatable for credit; students may enroll more than once if topic changes.
     

  
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    POL 391 - The Baltics Seminar: History, Business & Geopolitics in Eastern Europe

    Credits: 2
    This two-week international seminar explores the history, economics, and politics of the Baltic region. The seminar centers around the role of US embassies in the Baltics. Students will visit US embassies in Tallinn, Riga, and Vilnius, the respective capitals of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, and meet diplomatic officers with various economic and political responsibilities. Offered summer alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): Politics of Eastern Europe (pending)
  
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    POL 416 - International Political Economy

    Credits: 4
    Examines political aspects of international economic relations; global economy, development of international economic organizations and role of key national and transnational actors (e.g., United States and U.S.-based multinational corporations). Alternative theoretical approaches presented. Cross-listed as ECB 416 

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing, POL 106  and ECB 102 .
  
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    POL 425 - Internship in Government and Politics

    Credits: 2 to 6
    Combined on-the-job work experience and related academic study in variety of public and private sector settings here and abroad. Plan ahead to avoid conflicts with other degree requirements.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor, minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 and approval of Registrar’s Office. See Off-Campus course descriptions.
  
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    POL 434 - State, Citizen and Civil Society

    Credits: 2
    Primary emphasis on principles of Christian pluralism from Reformed and Catholic traditions. Develop individual projects in application of Christian principles to public policy questions in United States, Europe, developing world, international politics, etc. Senior capstone course in seminar format.

  
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    POL 471 - Research I

    Credits: 4
    Individual research for senior honors thesis.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    POL 472 - Research II

    Credits: 4
    Individual research for senior honors thesis.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    POL 473 - Research III

    Credits: 4
    Individual research for senior honors thesis.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of instructor.

Psychology

  
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    PSY 180 - Person in Psychological Context

    Credits: 4
    Explores psychological perspectives on nature of persons in cross-cultural context. Focuses on research and theory, and introduces the discipline of psychology. Topics addressed include learning, development, social behavior, physiology, personality, memory, emotion, thinking, and diagnosis and treatment of disorders.

  
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    PSY 225 - Psychology and Music

    Credits: 2
    This course gives an overview of research in psychology and music, and explores the intersections between music and psychology. Topics include psychophysics of sound, pitch, timbre and harmony, psychological functions and uses of music, approaches to music therapy, and musical identity.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  
  
  •  

    PSY 243 - Social Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Introduces research and theories about social dimensions of human thought and action. Topics include self-censorship, altruism, aggression, group behavior, persuasion, conformity, rejection, interpersonal perception and social cognition.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180 .
  
  •  

    PSY 245 - Life Span Developmental Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Considers social, cognitive, physical, and emotional aspects of human development from conception to death. Discussion of major issues at each stage of development, e.g., prenatal development, adolescence, cross-cultural differences in emerging adulthood, parenting, empty nest.  Students who have taken PSY244 or EDU 225 cannot get credit for this course.

  
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    PSY 246 - Clinical Psychology: Psychopathology

    Credits: 4
    Surveys psychopathology including psychosis, anxiety disorders, mood disorders and addictions; history of treatment and theory; current perspectives in treatment and prevention.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180 .
  
  •  

    PSY 250 - Psychology of Memory

    Credits: 4
    Examination of organization of cognitive functioning with particular emphasis on human memory and how information is perceived and processed. Studies most prominent features of human knowledge acquisition. Topics include short-term and permanent memories, retention and interference, and memory with and without awareness. Relevance of human memory to contemporary social issues (e.g., child sexual abuse and recovered memory/false memory controversy) also discussed.

  
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    PSY 256 - Research Methods I

    Credits: 4
    Focuses on using and understanding statistics in behavioral and natural sciences. Covers basic statistical methods including descriptive and inferential procedures, parametric and nonparametric considerations, probability, correlation, t-tests, regression and analysis of variance. Emphasizes selection and interpretation of statistical procedures and computer data analysis (SPSS). Fall semester.

  
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    PSY 257 - Research Methods II

    Credits: 4
    Presents approaches to conducting research in behavioral sciences. Explores entire research process from conception and design of research projects, research ethics, and data analysis and interpretation, to the dissemination of research findings. Examines quantitative and qualitative research; experimental, quasi-experimental and correlational designs. Lecture and laboratory. Research project required. Spring semester. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 256  
  
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    PSY 270 - Psycholinguistics

    Credits: 4
    Students study the prevalent theories of first language acquisition, speech perception, and language processing from a psycholinguistic perspective. Native language learning in children is compared with adult second language learning. Additional topics covered include bilingualism, disordered language.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  or LIN 200  
  
  •  

    PSY 275 - Neuroscience Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Explores tools and methods used by neuroscientists to study the brain (e.g., fMRI, ERP, PET, MEG). Both theoretical and empirical research discussed within topics of psychopathology, cognitive psychology, neuroethics and neural substrates of executive functions (e.g., memory, language, decision-making). Case studies of individuals suffering from disorders of the nervous system will be emphasized. Field trips to nearby neuroscience laboratories will be scheduled.

  
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    PSY 281 - Drugs and Behavior: Introduction to Psychopharmacology

    Credits: 2
    Explores frequently abused psychoactive drugs such as alcohol, marijuana, cocaine and heroin. Special emphasis placed on drugs used in treatment of mental health. The psychological and physiological components of drug use are discussed.

  
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    PSY 311 - Developmental Disabilities

    Credits: 4
    Reviews diagnosis and causes of emotional, cognitive and physical difficulties in infancy and childhood; individual and classroom behavioral interventions; play therapy. Field trips and observations.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  and one additional psychology course or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSY 322 - Counseling Theory and Practice

    Credits: 4
    Surveys major theoretical perspectives in counseling (e.g., client-centered, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, Gestalt perspectives). Explores assumptions about human nature in various approaches and introduces basic aspects of counseling relationships and ethical issues in counseling.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  and one additional course in psychology.
  
  •  

    PSY 340 - Personality Theories

    Credits: 4
    Analyzes major theoretical approaches to personality, sampling from psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, humanistic, sociobiological and cross-cultural perspectives. Covers Freud, Jung, Horney, Erikson, Rogers, Murray, Skinner, Allport, Kelly and others.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  and one additional psychology course or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    PSY 342 - Cognitive Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Explores relationship between cognition and reality focusing on questions of meaning and value. Topics include perceiving, acting, remembering, imagining, language, cultural evolution, artificial intelligence, and ecological and values-realizing approaches to psychology.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 257 , or permission of instructor for nonmajors.
  
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    PSY 346 - Clinical Issues

    Credits: 2
    Considers contemporary clinical psychology issues in context of theory and research, crisis intervention, therapeutic effectiveness. Repeatable for credit up to three times, as long as topic is different for each.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 246  or PSY 311  or PSY 322 
  
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    PSY 347 - Animal Behavior

    Credits: 4
    Analyzes major theoretical approaches to animal behavior: ethology, behaviorism, psychobiology and sociobiology; implications for human development. Field trips and field observations. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  and one additional psychology course for majors. Permission of instructor for nonmajors.
  
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    PSY 349 - Physiological Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Explores neurological correlates of behavior such as memory, language, emotion, sleep and psychiatric disorders. Topics discussed include brain injury and rehabilitation, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and aphasia.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 257  or permission of instructor.
 

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