Feb 24, 2020  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020

Course Descriptions


 

Psychology

  
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    PSY 351 - Wisdom, Intelligence, and Creativity

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Explores basic theory and research on creativity, wisdom, and intelligence. Assessment and enhancement of these attributes is also explored. Current debates (e.g. Flynn effect, group differences) are discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 257  
  
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    PSY 352 - Social Perception and Cognition

    Credits: 4
    Explores at advanced level research and theory on how people feel, act and think with respect to others. Topics such as cross-cultural psychology, emotion, trust, imitation, cooperation and moral dimensions of social interaction addressed. Laboratory. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 257  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PSY 360 - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    Credits: 2
    Examines integration of psychological principles with the business world. Selected topics within human resources are explored such as employee work motivation, personnel recruitment and selection, job redesign. Role of psychological testing in employment discussed.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180 .
  
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    PSY 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Studies theoretical or applied topics not regularly taught. Designated as repeatable if topic changes.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
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    PSY 380 - Neuroscience of Language

    Credits: 4
    This course takes a neurocognitive perspective to understand language and the human brain. Students become familiar with the mental processes connected to a language as well as neuroimaging techniques used to study the brain structures associated with them. The focus is on the building blocks of first and second language learning.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 180  
  
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    PSY 425 - Internship

    Credits: 4
    Applies selected psychological principles in community agency. Ten hours per week supervised field experience combined with exposure to theoretical issues in class. Taken in sequence.

    Prerequisite(s): Psychology major with junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. Credit: 4 credits psychology elective.
  
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    PSY 426 - Internship

    Credits: 4
    Applies selected psychological principles in community agency. Ten hours per week supervised field experience combined with exposure to theoretical issues in class. Taken in sequence.

    Prerequisite(s): Psychology major with junior or senior standing and consent of instructor. Credit: 4 credits general elective.
  
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    PSY 447 - Scientific and Philosophical Theories in Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Advanced consideration of fundamental issues in scientific theories of psychology. Recent developments and historically influential perspectives explored and evaluated with respect to fundamental issues in action, cognition, and emotion. Topics include cognitive science, culture and cognition, identity and development, behaviorism, ecological psychology, dynamical systems, learning, memory, judgment, and values. Fall semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.
  
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    PSY 471 - Research

    Credits: 1-4
    Research projects under supervising faculty member for upperclass psychology majors. Literature reviews, data collection and analysis, and written reports required.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
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    PSY 472 - Research II

    Credits: 1 - 4
    Continuation of research projects under supervising faculty member for upperclass psychology majors. Literature reviews, data collection and analysis, and written reports required.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.
  
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    PSY 491 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 2
    Examines practical and theoretical aspects of integration of psychology and Christian faith including models of integration and their limitations. Explores graduate school admission, job search, interviewing and other postgraduate issues. Integration paper required. Fall semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing.

Psychology Lab

  
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    PYL 340 - Personality Theories Lab

    Credits: 0
    This lab course applies concepts covered in PSY340 Personality Theories.  Topics covered include personality questionnaire, observational methods, and a research project. Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 257  
  
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    PYL 342 - Cognition Lab

    Credits: 0
    Explores higher-level skills in designing, evaluating and executing research on cognition. Demonstrates various phenomena in perception, coordination, memory, and decision-making. Major research project required. Lab fee.

  
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    PYL 347 - Animal Behavior Lab

    Credits: 0
    Field observations of animals in various settings. Research project required. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): PSY 257  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PYL 349 - Physiological Psychology Lab

    Credits: 0
    Neuroanatomy explored through brain dissection and electronic brain atlases. Hands-on experience with brain-imaging equipment to study psychophysiological relationships among brain waves (EEG) and other physiological measures for studying cognitive processing (e.g., memory, emotion, awareness). Lab fee.

  
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    PYL 352 - Social Perception and Cognition Lab

    Credits: 0
    Introduces methods of research on social interactions including field and laboratory experiments, observation (e.g., videotaping), interviewing and use of archival material. Independent research project required. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.


Recreation, Sport and Wellness

  
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    RSW 115 - Foundations of Recreation and Leisure

    Credits: 4
    Surveys psychological and sociological factors that influence the nature and scope of leisure, recreation, sport and wellness. Topics include the history of leisure, recreation, sport and wellness professions as well as the breadth of professional careers in recreation, sport and wellness.  

  
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    RSW 216 - Recreation and Sport Activity Analysis

    Credits: 4
    Examines skills, methods and techniques of instruction in recreational sports, games, crafts movement and dance.

  
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    RSW 218 - Programming and Evaluation

    Credits: 4
    Examines principles, policies and process of recreation, sport and wellness programming and evaluation, i.e., needs assessment, program development, public relations, funding and evaluation. Class project required to provide experiential model for programming process.

  
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    RSW 271 - Introduction to Sport and Recreation Management

    Credits: 4
    Introduces foundations of sport and recreation management. Topics include basic skills and competencies of planning, leading and organizing required of sport and recreation managers in various sport and recreation-related organizations.

  
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    RSW 272 - Sport Sociology

    Credits: 4
    Explores nature, position, functions and growing importance of sports in contemporary industrial society. Topics include relationships between sport and socialization, social mobility, racism, sexism, gender, deviance, youth sports, politics, economics and religion. Cross-listed as SOC 272 .

  
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    RSW 294 - Philosophy and Theories of Coaching

    Credits: 4
    Develops philosophy of coaching; organizational concepts; principles of coaching ethics; interrelational behavior of athletes and coaches; and integration of Christian faith in role of coach.

  
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    RSW 318 - Recreation and Sport Leadership

    Credits: 4
    Examines basic principles of recreational leadership process; theories of leadership styles; process and nature of group development; instructional strategies, methods and techniques of recreational service delivery. Includes field experience.

    Prerequisite(s): Major or minor, or permission of instructor.
  
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    RSW 323 - Recreation and Sport for Individuals with Special Needs

    Credits: 4
    Explores recreational and sport programs and activities designed for persons with social, emotional, mental and physical challenges, as well as geriatric populations. Includes field experience.

  
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    RSW 330 - Theories of Play, Games and Sport

    Credits: 4
    Examines social psychological dimensions of play, anthropological understanding of games, and sociological issues of sport. Includes explorative research project.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing.
  
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    RSW 368 - Sport Psychology

    Credits: 4
    Examines major psychological variables that influence sport participation and behavior in sport settings. Emphasis on application, description, explanation and prediction of sport participation and performance.

  
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    RSW 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Upper-level course focusing on selected topics in recreation and leisure not included in regular department offerings. Designated as repeatable if topic is different.

  
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    RSW 391 - History and Philosophy of Sport

    Credits: 4
    Historical and philosophical underpinnings of sport from primitive cultures to contemporary societies and their interrelationship with cultural values.

  
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    RSW 425 - Internship

    Credits: 0-8
    Supervised field assignment in recreational service setting combined with related academic study. Prepares students for professional career choices. Must be prearranged and approved by instructor and Registrar’s Office.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA.
  
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    RSW 471 - Research in Recreation, Sport and Wellness

    Credits: 4
    Supervised research project includes preparation of literature reviews, data collection and analysis, presentations and discussion of papers.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or senior standing, RSW 330 .
  
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    RSW 492 - Leisure Theories and Cultural Values

    Credits: 4
    Reviews major philosophical and sociological theories that shape cultural values toward leisure; Christian critique of role of leisure in contemporary society.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing. Open to nonmajors.

Sociology

  
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    SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: 4
    Sociological thinking is a significant means of self-understanding which then can be turned back to cultivate an understanding of the social world. Studying sociology can be a liberating experience that enlarges our sympathies and imagination, and transports us to an awareness of cultural settings different from our own. Sociology allows us insights into the working of social institutions, social differences, and social change in our micro and macro contexts. We will learn how these multiple forces influence our day-to-day lives. The practice of sociology enhances the possibilities of advancing human freedom in our globalized world.

  
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    SOC 102 - Why We Want: A Sociology of Desire and Consumption

    Credits: 4
    This course provides a general orientation to the discipline of sociology and surveys prominent theological, anthropological, psychological and sociological perspectives on the shaping of human wants, needs and tastes. In its focus on the institutional mechanisms of consumer society, it fosters awareness of the social and environmental consequences of our collective patterns of consumption and encourages moral and ethical reflection on the same.

    Introductory sociology and social work course.
  
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    SOC 103 - Social Movements

    Credits: 4


    This course provides students with a sociological understanding of social movements that seek to bring about or resist social, political and economic change. Students will learn about when and why social movements occur, who joins and drops out, how do movements decline, and what changes are brought about by movements. This course blends theory with rich examples from the Civil Rights Movement, the Women’s Movement, the Gay and Lesbian Movement, the Environmental Movement, the New American Right Movement, among others. Students will be able to understand social movements and their connection to other forms of collective action, such as civic engagement, participation in governance, advocacy, and others.

    Introductory course option for sociology and social work majors, sociology minors.

    Core social sciences option.

  
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    SOC 171 - Selected Topics

    Credits: Variable
    Explores topic not regularly offered. Designated as repeatable for credit; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. Offered as needed. Fees as needed.

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor.
     
  
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    SOC 200 - Leading for the Common Good

    Credits: 2
    This course explores the rise, reign, and fall of leaders in human societies (the powerful, the influential, the celebrated, the stars) with emphasis on the contemporary United States. The focus is comparative, using sociological analysis but also drawing from contributions from other fields. The course explores leaders in various fields and reflects on the topic of leadership from the perspective of Christian theology as we seek to advance the common good. Every three years.

  
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    SOC 221 - Power, Prestige and Poverty

    Credits: 4
    Analyzes structured social inequality and poverty in human societies. Examines historical systems of stratification based on variety of distributed social resources. Surveys social scientific explanations of stratification, commentaries on its impact on individuals and society, and competing ideologies of inequality. Cross-listed as SWK 221  

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SOC 232 - Diversity in U.S. Populations

    Credits: 4
    Surveys social diversity in the spheres of race and ethnicity, gender, religion and class in the U.S. in order to understand social stratification. Explores various historical, social and economic forces which have contributed to the emergence and assignment of multiple identities among Americans. Cross-listed as SWK 232  

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SOC 272 - Sport Sociology

    Credits: 4
    See RSW 272  course description. Cross-listed as RSW 272 .

  
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    SOC 285 - Foundations of Sociological Thought

    Credits: 4
    Studies early development of social thought, social and philosophical roots of sociology, and nature of 19th-century sociological theory. Focuses on works of Marx, Durkheim, Weber and Simmel.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SOC 290 - Urban Sociology

    Credits: 4
    Explores historical, economic and cultural factors that contributed to creation of modern urban environment. Examines how contemporary political, economic and social issues impact lives of urban residents. Special emphasis placed on narratives of postindustrial urban dwellers.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SOC 291 - International Seminars in Production and Place

    Credits: 2-4
    Examines impact of global trade in a commodity on locales where the commodity is produced. Involves travel throughout locale; significant exposure to people, culture and history; hands-on experience with basic processes of production; examination of global commodity chain that moves goods into hands of consumers. Contact Global Education Office. Cross-listed as SWK 291  

  
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    SOC 308 - Sociology of Literature

    Credits: 4
    Explores literary text as social context and the role of literary texts as cultural documents. Examines how writers reflect prevailing social realities, social institutions and structures through their portraits of human character and social phenomena. Uses literary criticism and cultural criticism to study the role of literature to initiate social description and transformation.

  
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    SOC 310 - Statistics for Social Research

    Credits: 4
    Discusses logic of statistical analysis in social research including matters of probability and sampling. Introduces univariate descriptive measures, multivariate statistics, and logic of inference and hypothesis testing. Weekly data analysis assignments employ Statistics Package for Social Sciences. Cross-listed as SWK 310   Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course for sociology majors, or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 311 - Social Research Methods

    Credits: 4
    Introduces logic of social scientific research. Explores different epistemological stances informing social-scientific inquiry and traces methodological implications. Specific methods covered include survey research, archival research, content analysis, comparative-historical analysis, field research, participant observation and others. Requires development of independent research proposal. Cross-listed as SWK 311  

  
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    SOC 322 - Social Policy and Institutions

    Credits: 4
    Examines domestic social policy issues, problems and programs in light of conflicting values, limited resources and matters of political/economic power. Cross-listed as SWK 322  

  
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    SOC 325 - Sociology of Education

    Credits: 4
    Explores ways in which institution of education supports and obstructs student’s transition into private and public spheres. Examines way structural factors such as class, race and gender operate to encourage and limit academic success throughout academic career. Special emphasis on students critically examining their own educational biography while working toward constructing innovative educational curricula based on their academic experiences and Christian mandates. (Alternate years.)

  
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    SOC 328 - Sociology of Religion

    Credits: 4
    Introduces and critiques assumptions, methods and theoretical insights of sociological study of religion. Emphasizes social context of religious behavior and beliefs, role of religion in social change, and development of new religious movements.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SOC 333 - Sociology of Gender

    Credits: 4
    Explores way femininity and masculinity have been informed by cultural practices throughout American history. Utilizes research from journalism, social science, women’s studies, and psychoanalysis to explore how certain behaviors and attitudes assumed to be naturally feminine or masculine are actually result of socialization. Grapples with implications of Christian faith for gender identity in contemporary American society.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SOC 335 - Globalisation and Social Change

    Credits: 4
    Examines social change and continuity, development and underdevelopment in non-Western societies. Addresses impact of colonialism, modernity and globalization on cultures of these societies. Evaluates theories and models for development and modernization from Christian perspective. Cross-listed as SWK 335  

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course and junior standing.
  
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    SOC 340 - Women and Globalisation

    Credits: 4
    Explores various cross-cultural perspectives on gender in contemporary lives of women. Examines impact of traditional social systems on social and economic development of women, and addresses women’s critiques and suggestions for democratic social change. Incorporates current multidisciplinary research on gender.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course and junior standing.
  
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    SOC 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Various topics covered on rotating basis. Designed for advanced students interested in topic presented.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Designated as repeatable if different topic.
  
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    SOC 411 - Contemporary Social Theory

    Credits: 4
    Surveys prominent schools of 20th-century social thought. Links developments in sociological theorizing to broader intellectual trends of period. Perspectives surveyed include phenomenology, symbolic interactionism, functionalism, neo-Marxian theory, structuralism and poststructuralism, feminist theory, and rational-choice theory.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 285  or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 425 - Social Service Internship

    Credits: Variable
    Supervised combined on-the-job work experience or research and related academic study in agency, business, government office or community organization.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing in sociology, minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA and preapproval by instructor and Registrar’s Office.
  
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    SOC 471 - Research I

    Credits: 2-4
    Individual research for honors thesis.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and departmental permission.
  
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    SOC 472 - Research II

    Credits: 2-4
    Individual research for honors thesis.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and departmental permission.

Spanish

  
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    SPN 101 - Beginning Spanish I

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to Spanish language and Hispanic cultures with practice in four skills associated with language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. SPN101 conducted primarily in Spanish; Language placement score required.

    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    SPN 102 - Beginning Spanish II

    Credits: 4
    Introduction to Spanish language and Hispanic cultures with practice in four skills associated with language learning: listening, speaking, reading and writing. SPN102 conducted in Spanish. Language placement score required

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 101  
    Fulfills common core requirement.
  
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    SPN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I

    Credits: 4
    Continued study and practice in Spanish language and Hispanic cultures through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Conducted in Spanish.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 102 , placement score or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II

    Credits: 4
    Continued study and practice in Spanish language and Hispanic cultures through listening, speaking, reading and writing.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 201 , placement score or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPN 311 - Advanced Spanish Syntax

    Credits: 4
    Development of understanding of more complex points of syntax and idiomatic expressions through explanation, practice and application in both oral and written format. Conducted in Spanish. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202 , placement score or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 313 - Advanced Spanish Writing

    Credits: 4
    Focus on idiomatic expressions and style needed for various kinds of writing. Conducted in Spanish. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202 , placement score or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 315 - Advanced Spanish Conversation

    Credits: 4
    Development of facility in spoken Spanish through simulation of situations, oral reports and discussion of contemporary topics. Conducted in Spanish. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 313  or equivalent or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPN 360 - Spanish History, Culture and Civilization

    Credits: 4
    Survey of geography, history, fine arts, religious makeup, economics and demographics of Spain. Conducted in Spanish. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311 , SPN 313  or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 362 - Latin American History, Culture and Civilization

    Credits: 4
    Survey of geography, history, fine arts, religious makeup, economics and demographics of Latin America. Conducted in Spanish. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311 , SPN 313  or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 370 - Survey of Spanish Peninsular Literature

    Credits: 4
    Study of representative literature of Spain in historical and cultural settings. Conducted in Spanish. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311 , SPN 313  or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 371 - Selected Topics

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Explores pertinent literary, linguistic or cultural topic not specifically covered elsewhere in curriculum. Designated as repeatable; students may enroll more than once if topic changes. Variable credit, although a set number of credits may be required in order to fulfill specific categories.

    Prerequisite(s): Set by instructor.
  
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    SPN 372 - Survey of Latin American Literature

    Credits: 4
    Study of representative literature of Latin America in historical and cultural settings. Conducted in Spanish. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311 , SPN 313  or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 425 - Internship in Spanish Conversation and Culture

    Credits: 4
    Supervised experience in Spanish-speaking environment; individualized syllabus for each student combining on-the-job work experience with related academic study.

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 202  or equivalent, permission of instructor, minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA and approval by Registrar’s Office.
  
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    SPN 491 - Seminar in Spanish Topics I

    Credits: 2
    In-depth study of chosen area of literature or culture of Spain. Students make several presentations. Conducted in Spanish. Designated as repeatable for credit if topic differs. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311  or SPN 313  or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 492 - Seminar in Spanish Topics II

    Credits: 2
    In-depth study of chosen area of literature or culture of Spain. Students make several presentations. Conducted in Spanish. Designated as repeatable for credit if topic differs. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311  or SPN 313  or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 493 - Seminar in Latin American Topic I

    Credits: 2
    In-depth study of chosen area of literature or culture of Latin America. Students make several presentations. Conducted in Spanish. Designated as repeatable for credit if topic differs. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311 , SPN 313  or equivalent.
  
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    SPN 494 - Seminar in Latin American Topic II

    Credits: 2
    In-depth study of chosen area of literature or culture of Latin America. Students make several presentations. Conducted in Spanish. Designated as repeatable for credit if topic differs. (Every third year)

    Prerequisite(s): SPN 311 , SPN 313  or equivalent.

Social Work

  
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    SWK 201 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

    Credits: 4
    Introduces social work as a helping profession; includes history, values, knowledge and skill bases; addresses people in their environment and interaction of spiritual, biological, psychological and social systems with them. Highlights social work methods, settings, problem areas, client populations, social policy and institutions, and service delivery systems. Includes 25-hour contextual learning in a human service setting.

  
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    SWK 202 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    Credits: 4
    Uses systems model for examining interaction of individuals, families, cultural and social systems as well as behaviors, attitudes, values and problems related to different cultural, ethnic, sex and age groups and other populations at risk. Takes life span approach using sociological, psychological and biological knowledge to describe human growth and development, tasks and milestones. Uses systems model to describe interactions between the bio-psycho-social influences on development for each age group.

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 201  or permission of instructor.
  
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    SWK 221 - Power, Prestige and Poverty

    Credits: 4
    Analyzes structured social inequality and poverty in human societies. Examines historical systems of stratification based on variety of distributed social resources. Surveys social scientific explanations of stratification, commentaries on its impact on individuals and society, and competing ideologies of inequality. Cross-listed as SOC 221  

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SWK 232 - Diversity in U.S. Populations

    Credits: 4
    Surveys social diversity in the spheres of race and ethnicity, gender, religion and class in the U.S. in order to understand social stratification. Explores various historical, social and economic forces which have contributed to the emergence and assignment of multiple identities among Americans. Cross-listed as SOC 232  

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course.
  
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    SWK 291 - International Seminars in Production and Place

    Credits: 2-4
    Examines impact of global trade in a commodity on locales where the commodity is produced. Involves travel throughout locale; significant exposure to people, culture and history; hands-on experience with basic processes of production; examination of global commodity chain that moves goods into hands of consumers. Contact Global Education Office. Cross-listed as SOC 291  

  
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    SWK 301 - Helping Theories and Practice with Individuals and Families

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the generalist model of social work practice using problem-solving and ecological systems frameworks for working with individuals and families. It introduces theoretical principles, focuses on the development of self-awareness and basic interviewing skills, and formulates helping strategies for work in a wide variety of problem situations and client populations.

    Prerequisite(s): Social Work major, junior standing, SWK 201 , SWK 202 ; or permission of instructor.
  
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    SWK 302 - Theory and Practice with Groups and Organizations

    Credits: 4
    Examines role of groups in organizations, and organizational systems in communities; introduces students to both group and organizational theory and dynamics. Students learn and practice facilitation skills for psychoeducational groups, mutual aid groups, task groups, interagency teams and community meetings. Students learn and practice skills in organizational analysis, strategic planning, program development and evaluation, conflict resolution, collaboration, and leadership development. Includes case studies of high-impact nonprofits, innovations in government, faith-based initiatives, cross-sector partnerships and global social change networks. Synthesizes systems framework with group and organizational theory and practice.

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 201 , SWK 202  or permission of instructor.
  
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    SWK 310 - Statistics for Social Research

    Credits: 4
    Discusses logic of statistical analysis in social research including matters of probability and sampling. Introduces univariate descriptive measures, multivariate statistics, and logic of inference and hypothesis testing. Weekly data analysis assignments employ Statistics Package for Social Sciences. Cross-listed as SOC 310   Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course for sociology majors, or permission of instructor.
  
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    SWK 311 - Social Research Methods

    Credits: 4
    Introduces logic of social scientific research. Explores different epistemological stances informing social-scientific inquiry and traces methodological implications. Specific methods covered include survey research, experimental research, archival research, content analysis, evaluation research, comparative-historical analysis, field research, participant observation and others. Course concludes with a research project. Cross-listed as SOC 311  

    Prerequisite(s): Requires development of independent research proposal.
  
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    SWK 322 - Social Policy and Institutions

    Credits: 4
    Examines the history, current status, and future options of domestic social policies and programs in light of cultural values, economic resources, and power distribution. Cross-listed as SOC 322  

  
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    SWK 335 - Globalisation and Social Change

    Credits: 4
    Examines social change and continuity, development and underdevelopment in non-Western societies. Addresses impact of colonialism, modernity and globalization on cultures of these societies. Evaluates theories and models for development and modernization from Christian perspective. Cross-listed as SOC 335  

    Prerequisite(s): A 100-level sociology course and junior standing.
  
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    SWK 391 - Seminar

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Topics rotate; designed for any social work major or other advanced student interested in topic. Offered periodically.

    Prerequisite(s): Social work major, SWK 201 , SWK 202 , or permission of instructor. Designated as repeatable if different topic.
  
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    SWK 401 - Community and Sustainability

    Credits: 4
    Explores theoretical and practical aspects of community political economy with a view toward sustainability. Historical and contemporary efforts in community organizing and community development discussed. Explores role of community-based organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 201 , SWK 202 , SWK 301 , SWK 302 ; Sustainable Development minors with junior or senior standing; or permission of instructor.
  
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    SWK 420 - Practicum Seminar

    Credits: 2
    Taken concurrently with SWK 425  and SWK 426 . Integrates theory and practice through instruction and discussion; information and experience from various settings; group supervision. Examines socialization into profession and handling of personal values and practice.

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 201 , SWK 202 , SWK 301 , SWK 302 , SWK 310 , SWK 311 , SWK 322 , SWK 401 .
  
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    SWK 425 - Practicum I

    Credits: 6
    Major field practice internship in local human service agency. Students work 32 hours per week (400 hours total) in professional-level roles, providing social services to clients under instruction and supervision; challenging settings. Develops and practices professional skills; matches interests and goals.

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 201  SWK 202  SWK 301  SWK 302  SWK 310  SWK 311 , SWK 322  SWK 401 .
  
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    SWK 426 - Practicum II

    Credits: 6
    Major field practice internship in local human service agency. Students work 32 hours per week (400 hours total) in professional-level roles, providing social services to clients under instruction and supervision; challenging settings. Develops and practices professional skills; matches interests and goals.

    Prerequisite(s): SWK 201 , SWK 202 , SWK 301 , SWK 302 , SWK 310 , SWK 311 , SWK 322 , SWK 401 .

Social Welfare

  
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    SWL 201 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

    Credits: 4
    Introduces social work as a helping profession; includes history, values, knowledge and skill bases; addresses people in their environment and interaction of spiritual, biological, psychological and social systems with them. Highlights social work methods, settings, problem areas, client populations, social policy and institutions, and service delivery systems. Includes 25-hour contextual learning in a human service setting.  Cross-listed as SWK 201  

  
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    SWL 202 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    Credits: 4
    Uses systems model for examining interaction of individuals, families, cultural and social systems as well as behaviors, attitudes, values and problems related to different cultural, ethnic, sex and age groups and other populations at risk. Takes life span approach using sociological, psychological and biological knowledge to describe human growth and development, tasks and milestones. Uses systems model to describe interactions between the bio-psycho-social influences on development for each age group.  Cross-listed as SWK 202  

    Prerequisite(s): SWL 201 /SWK 201  or permission of instructor.
  
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    SWL 301 - Helping Theories and Practice with Individuals and Families

    Credits: 4
    This course examines the generalist model of social work practice using problem-solving and ecological systems frameworks for working with individuals and families. It introduces theoretical principles, focuses on the development of self-awareness and basic interviewing skills, and formulates helping strategies for work in a wide variety of problem situations and client populations.  Cross-listed as SWK 301  

    Prerequisite(s): Social welfare major, junior standing, SWL 201 /SWK 201   SWL 202 /SWK 202  ; or permission of instructor.
  
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    SWL 322 - Social Policy and Institutions

    Credits: 4
    Examines the history, current status, and future options of domestic social policies and programs in light of cultural values, economic resources, and power distribution. Cross-listed as SWK 322  

  
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    SWL 401 - Helping Theories and Practice: Groups, Organizations and Communities

    Credits: 4
    Applies generalist social work empowerment model using problem-solving and ecological systems frameworks. Introduces structure and process of helping and task-oriented groups; influence and effectiveness of individuals, organizations, and community systems; social action and intervention.

  
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    SWL 425 - Internship

    Credits: 4
    Combines work experience specifically designed to help students gain the relevant, hands-on experience employers desire with related academic study. It must be prearranged and approved by the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, SWL 301 SWL 401 ; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.

Sustainable Development

  
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    SDV 425 - Sustainable Development Internship

    Credits: 2-6
    Internship applicable to the Sustainable Development minor.

    Prerequisite(s): Form required.

Theatre Arts

  
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    THT 010 - Theatre Hour

    Credits: 0
    Monthly time set aside for department and visiting guest artists, lectures, workshops and presentations. Except when studying abroad, theatre arts majors are required to attend each semester. Focus is upon developing skills and networks for professional theatre work.

    Prerequisite(s): Major or minor.
  
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    THT 110 - Acting for Non-majors

    Credits: 2
    Geared toward students not majoring in theatre, this course explores the study and practice of acting; how actors fuse thought, emotion, and action into the truthful performance of a character. The course is designed to benefit students contemplating a career involving public communication.

  
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    THT 150 - Technical Production I

    Credits: 4
    Offers basic understanding of technical aspects of theatre production through direct involvement in mounting of Gordon’s theatrical productions. Analysis, problem solving and processes applied in areas of stage carpentry, scene painting, properties, lighting, costuming, stage management and theatrical materials. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

  
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    THT 234 - Introduction to Theatre

    Credits: 4
    Introduces all major areas of theatre, including acting, design, directing and writing. Open to all students as option for fine arts requirement of general core and includes experience-oriented, hands-on lab time as well as reflective assignments in play analysis and performance criticism.

 

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