Feb 19, 2020  
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Undergraduate Academic Catalog 2019-2020

Course Descriptions


 

Theatre Arts

  
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    THT 235 - Fundamentals of Acting

    Credits: 4
    Explores actor’s role; emphasizes technique, characterization, movement and critical analysis.

  
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    THT 240 - Voice Study

    Credits: 4
    Voice technique for actor focusing on developing lifelong practice of freeing natural voice, becoming more conscious of entire self as an instrument of honest and truthful communication.

  
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    THT 243 - Contemporary Theatre: British

    Credits: 2
    This half-semester course is a study of significant plays and playwrights (both established and emerging) of the past decade of British Theatre and the styles, directions, themes, concerns and trends they represent.

    Core Fine Arts
  
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    THT 250 - Technical Production II

    Credits: 4
    Continues study and application of principles of theatrical production begun in THT 150 , guided to greater depth of understanding and mastery of skills with emphasis on independent thinking and problem solving related to projects for specific productions. (Alternate years.) Lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): THT 150 .
  
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    THT 275 - Musical Theatre

    Credits: 4
    Introduces basic skills of singer-actor through classroom exercises, games and rehearsal techniques. Students cultivate performance skills in workshop environment, enhance critical eye and constructive coaching abilities and expand appreciation of musical theatre genre. Designated as repeatable.

  
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    THT 291 - International Seminar: Studies on British Stage

    Credits: 4
    Students read essays which guide viewing of theatre performances in London, Edinburgh and a Shakespeare production.

  
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    THT 310 - Theatre History I: Aeschylus to Zola

    Credits: 4
    Examines in depth great periods, writers and representative plays of Ancient Greece through turn of 20th century, analyzing social and cultural context, thematic concerns and dramaturgical styles of major theatrical movements. While primarily focused on development of Western literature, some Eastern and African origins, literature and styles are also explored. (Alternate years.)

  
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    THT 320 - Theatre History II: 20th-Century

    Credits: 4
    Examines in depth explosive theatrical changes provoked by realism and reactions to realism throughout 20th century. Major writers, works and styles read and analyzed in terms of social context, thematic concerns and cultural impact. (Alternate years.)

  
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    THT 371 - Selected Topics in Theatre

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Group-intensive laboratory designed to explore special topics in theatre including but not limited to voice production, movement, stage combat, dialects, acting styles, theatre design, musical theatre, interpretive studies for historical enactor, and topics related to specific productions in annual season. Whenever possible national and local professionals participate as guest artists. Designated as repeatable if topic is different. (Offered periodically.)

  
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    THT 375 - Professional Skills

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Courses in specialized areas of theatre offered periodically in conjunction with productions. Taught by professionals with training and expertise in specific fields. Skills include movement, stage combat, dialects, etc.

  
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    THT 381 - Independent Study

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Independent semester-long course in topic not available in existing curriculum; provides curricular enrichment. Limited availability subject to faculty workload. May require lab fee.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative average of 2.75, adequate background to support topic, permission of instructor, advisor, department chair and registrar.
  
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    THT 410 - Directing

    Credits: 4
    Studies fundamentals of directing including blocking, character analysis, script interpretation, securing rights, organizing and preparing budgets, exploring director/actor and director/designer relationships, articulating directorial concept and developing directorial perspective and process. (Alternate years.)

    Prerequisite(s): THT 150 , THT 234 , THT 235 , THT 250 , THT 310 , THT 320 .
  
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    THT 425 - Internship: Theatre

    Credits: 2 or 4
    Supervised learning experience in appropriate setting combining on-the-job work experience with related academic study. Must be prearranged and approved by instructor and Registrar’s Office.

    Prerequisite(s): Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00.
  
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    THT 490 - Senior Seminar

    Credits: 4
    Senior capstone courses explore integration of theatre arts and Christian faith as well as central question “Why do theatre?” Focus given to preparation for graduate school admission, professional auditions, job search, networking and other postgraduate issues.


Uganda Studies Program

  
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    USP 101 - Luganda I

    Credits: 3
    Introductory language Level I and Level II may be taken in same semester.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 102 - Luganda II

    Credits: 3
    Introductory language Level I and Level II may be taken in same semester.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 103 - Kiswahili I

    Credits: 3
    Introductory language Level I and Level II may be taken in same semester.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 104 - Kiswahili II

    Credits: 3
    Introductory language Level I and Level II may be taken in same semester.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 314 - Microbiology

    Credits: 3-4
    Covers general aspects of microbiology with emphasis on endemic microorganisms and human interaction. Topics include introduction to microbiology, microbial taxonomy, methods of microbial identification, immunity and infection and epidemiology of tropical diseases.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
    Equivalent to BIO 314 .
  
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    USP 320 - Religion in Contemporary Uganda

    Credits: 3
    Examines and familiarizes students with three major religions which have had a strong influence in Uganda: African Traditional Religion (Baganda, Bagisu and Acholi), Islam and Christianity. Study of ATR is phenomenological; study of Islam emphasizes basic understanding and appreciation of life of prophet Muhammad, formative influence on Islam and cultural influence. Examines influence of Christianity in Uganda and historical interaction between the three religions and issues of interfaith dialogue and understanding.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 321 - Infectious Disease and Epidemiology

    Credits: 4
    This course will bring students of multiple pre health and public health profession tracks to the essential understandings of fundamental immunology and the etiology and epidemiology of communicable and non-communicable diseases of global health. This course will provide undergraduate scientific understanding to the global health seminar and practicum experiences of field placements within a didactic and discussion based classroom experience. This course is organized into three (3) blocks, which will investigate different aspects of the fundamentals of immunology as it relates to infectious disease and global health. Each week will contain assigned readings from the texts, with supplemental handouts. Each day of class subsequent to the first day of class will have a quiz, each block will end with an exam, and the course culminates with a comprehensive final exam. 

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  and BIO 106 ,  or score of 5 on the AP Biology exam.
    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 323 - Health and Wholeness

    Credits: 3
    This course teaches principles of health promotion (nutrition, hygiene, sexuality/HIV prevention, sanitation/water, maternal/child health and fitness) and interventions with people who are sick or injured (first aid and early intervention, infectious diseases, and sexually transmitted infections, addictions) and finally, building a healthy society. It does this within a context of wholeness, in which “health” is not the absence of disease but a state of physical, emotional, social, and spiritual wellbeing. The course is applied, causing students to reflect on how to apply lessons to their own lives or the lives of family and friends.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 332 - Faith and Action in the Ugandan Context

    Credits: 4
    Combines traditional classroom component with broad spectrum of experiential learning including living and studying with Ugandan students; regular volunteer service; home stays; travel to various regions; and exposure to various social services, e.g., orphanages, hospitals, schools. Program core. Required of all participants.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 335 - African Literature

    Credits: 3
    Examines the literature of sub-Saharan Africa. Students will become familiar with the distinctive features of literature from East, West, and Southern Africa, and with the genres of oral literature, fiction (both short story and novel), poetry, and drama. Students will study works on their own merit in regard to theme and style, and also for their insights into African society and the concepts of negritude and black aesthetics.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 345 - East African History from 1800 to Independence

    Credits: 3
    Examines the history of Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Rwanda from 1800 to independence. Students will become familiar with the pre-colonial era and with colonialism and its effects on East African culture and indigenous social institutions. We will review East African reaction to colonial policies and survey cultural and social changes experienced in East Africa during the colonial period up to the time of decolonialisation. The focus on the history of this period will be done through the eyes of the cultures it affected rather than through the eyes of objective history.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 347 - Understanding Worldviews

    Credits: 3
    Introduces importance and means of forming worldview which integrates faith and life. Considers meaning and relevance of creation and evolution, of beginning of life, sin and evil, different offers of salvation and various ways to live one’s life in contemporary world. Relates topics of course to African setting as well as to larger global context of today’s world.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 348 - Understanding Ethics from a Christian Perspective

    Credits: 3
    Introduces basic concepts of ethics, with particular emphasis on Christian moral teaching. Students will relate reading topics to contemporary setting in Africa.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 352 - East African Politics Since Independence

    Credits: 3
    Introduces politics of East Africa. Provides historical context for understanding contemporary politics in East Africa and theoretical and conceptual tools for analyzing recent developments in East Africa. Provides significant specific information about individual countries. Focuses on politics of Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Rwanda, starting with struggle for independence and concluding with analyses of current political events in each country. Program core.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 365 - Social Work Practicum Junior Level

    Credits: 6
    Provides students with opportunities to integrate social work theory and practice in a cross-cultural setting. Students will complete a minimum of 150 hours of practice at an approved service location in Uganda. Each student will be on-site 2 days per week under the supervision of her/his field instructor and a staff supervisor from the Uganda Studies Program (USP). In addition students will participate in a one-hour seminar class each week. The seminar will provide additional opportunities for reflection and feedback with input from both staff and peers. Available only to social work majors/minors.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 372 - August Modular Course

    Credits: 3
    Fall-semester Global Health students will take a three-week modular course in Uganda before the regular semester begins. The course will change each semester, but will feature topics in health taught by Westmont faculty.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 425 - Cross-Cultural Practicum

    Credits: 3
    The Cross Cultural Practicum provides students with the opportunity to enrich their understanding of culture and cultural differences and similarities as well as further develop and practice their own cultural competence through active service learning and participation and integration into a Ugandan community. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 40 hours at an approved practicum site, engage in their respective living context communities (UCU for on-campus students and local neighborhoods for Homestay students), and interact with guest speakers, site visits and travel in Uganda. 

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 427 - Social Work Practicum–Senior Level

    Credits: 12
    Opportunity to integrate social work theory and practice in a cross-cultural setting. Requires direct communication and coordination between Uganda Studies Program and student’s social work department.

    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.
  
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    USP 428 - Cross Cultural Practicum & Global Health Seminar

    Credits: 4


    The Cross Cultural Practicum (3 credits) and Global Health Seminar (1 credit) are taught as a combined course that is required for all Global Health Students. The Cross Cultural component provides students with the opportunity to enrich their understanding of culture as well as further develop and practice their own cultural competence through active service learning and participation and integration into a Ugandan community.

    Global Health Students will complete a minimum of 80 hours at an approved practicum site and will meet for an additional hour each week for the Global Health Seminar to discuss and process issues relating to their health related internships. 

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 105  and BIO 106 , or a score of 5 on the AP Biology exam.
    Corequisite(s): Available only to students participating in the BestSemester Uganda Studies Program.


Westmont Urban Studies Program

  
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    WUS 041 - Health and Fitness in the City

    Credits: 0
    This course is designed to help Westmont in San Francisco students stay active and healthy while offering opportunities to explore the landscapes, streetscapes and local opportunities for indoor physical activities throughout the City. Involvement in this course will give students practice in exploring new urban spaces, in minimizing your impact on resources, and in discovering how some forms of exercise can help navigate the stress of urban living.

  
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    WUS 194 - Independent Study Project

    Credits: 4
    Learning contract under guidance of San Francisco–based faculty.

  
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    WUS 195 - Seminar in Urban Studies

    Credits: 4
    Takes up an interdisciplinary approach to examine the city and its impact on human history and communities. Meets three hours per week. Required of all participants.

  
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    WUS 210 - Modern Grammar and Advanced Composition

    Credits: 4
    Nonfiction prose workshop emphasizes revision and style through peer-review sessions, in-class writing, mini-lessons, workshops and oral presentation. Nonfiction prose by diverse writers read to explore narrative, interpretive, descriptive, persuasive and expository writing. Students hone investigative research skills, using local resources.

    Prerequisite(s): First-year writing course.
  
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    WUS 334 - Ethnicity, Race and the City in Literature

    Credits: 4
    Upper-division literature course explores traditions in the U.S.’s diverse cultural literatures, and literary representations of relations between and within different ethnic and racial communities. Emphasizes The City as a crucible of cultural transformation. Examines mostly Modern and Contemporary American narratives, including some poetry. Focuses on representations of immigration, assimilation, alienation, racism, exclusion, ethnic pride and cultural difference in The City. (Fall only.)

    Prerequisite(s): One literature course or consent of the instructor.
  
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    WUS 380 - Entrepreneurship & Social Innovation

    Credits: 4
    Guides students through successful strategies for developing breakthrough products and services. Through weekly classes and concurrent research lab involvements this seminar is designed to advance the entrepreneurial mindset of students by connecting with the brightest minds in the region.

    Will apply as ISE 305 - Introduction to Social Enterprise  in the Innovation & Social Enterprise Minor. Course may not be taken if you already have credit for ISE 305.
  
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    WUS 388 - Engaging the City

    Credits: 1


    Engaging the City is a one-unit course Introduction to San Francisco that will take place the first half of the semester and provides essential background and context to help students understand the history and diversity of San Francisco, especially the challenges and opportunities facing specific neighborhoods of this  city where they will be living, learning, and working for a semester.

    Students will engage with the presence and influence of “The City” in our world by becoming more confident navigating this particular city, San Francisco. As students become accustomed to navigating this city, they will deepen their encounter with the urban world. Students will gain knowledge and experience of the city’s diverse social and cultural communities through field trips, interviews, reading, and neighborhood studies. Part of the Westmont Urban Studies program; Westmont course number IS 188.

    Prerequisite(s): Global Education Office approval

  
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    WUS 389 - Faith, Culture, and Diversity

    Credits: 4
    This course invites students to cultivate a deeper awareness of, and engagement with, cultural difference and diversity–specifically in relation to the urban context of the San Francisco Bay Area that will serve as the living-learning laboratory for an integrative exploration into the themes of a) empathy and compassion; intercultural intelligence and competency; and social privilege and inequality from a committed, hospitable Christian worldview perspective. This course is part of the Westmont in San Francisco program; Westmont course number IS 189.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval by Global Education Office
  
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    WUS 425 - Urban Practicum

    Credits: 8


    This 8-unit course is centered on participation in an internship related to the professional and vocational interests of each student. Internship opportunities exist for students of all majors. The amount of major credit received is determined by departmental guidelines and the type of internship selected. Components of the course include attendance at all placement orientation workshops during the first week of the semester (for fall/spring only); interviewing with at least three agencies/organizations prior to selecting an internship site; development of a detailed learning contract in consultation with one’s site supervisor; and engagement with regular reading and writing assignments aimed at the reflective integration of theory and praxis.

    The internship is accompanied by a required weekly seminar. The purpose of this required seminar is to enable students to critically engage and reflect on their daily internship experiences in renewed faith-based ways. The course is designed to foster a deeper understanding of personal-vocational identity. Through guest speaker presentations and shared dialogue on common workplace dynamics, this course seeks to help students discover what it means to live faithfully amidst a range of complex and diverse settings while integrating a Christ-centered perspective.

 

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